Haskell's Beach Hazards Removal Activity Begins

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Source: City of Goleta

On Monday, November 16, 2020, California State Lands Commission (CSLC) contractor Cushman Contracting Corporation will commence work to remove remnant oil and gas operation pipelines that currently protrude outward from the coastal bluffs at Haskell’s Beach.

This work is part of ongoing efforts by CSLC and the City to remove all remnant oil and gas operation hazards from the Ellwood coastline. These remnant hazards are a result of early oil and gas exploration at Ellwood that began in the 1920s. When these operations ceased mid-century, the infrastructure created to support the operations were not properly abandoned. As a result, the Ellwood coastline is littered with remnant oil and gas operations hazards. These hazards include protruding wellheads and well casings, wood and steel piles, pipelines, and wood beams and structures. The hazards often become visible after large storm events that cause coastal erosion. Since 2011, CSLC has conducted hazards removal work on seven occasions at Ellwood.

As part of the removal work that will commence November 16th, staging of equipment will occur at the emergency access point just east of the beach house at the Ritz-Carlton Bacara. There will be monitors onsite to document the progress of beach hazards removal for the duration of the work. The work is expected to take approximately 2 days.

For more information, click here to visit the project webpage.


CSLC Haskell's Beach Hazards Removal

Pictured: Joint City-State Lands Commission Project to Remove Historic Oil and Gas Infrastructure from Haskell’s Beach in 2019

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SBZZ Nov 16, 2020 09:31 PM
Haskell's Beach Hazards Removal Activity Begins

So glad to hear this. A few years ago at Haskells they pulled out old steel posts sticking out of the bedrock below the sand that were waiting to impale someone.

macpuzl Nov 16, 2020 06:31 PM
Haskell's Beach Hazards Removal Activity Begins

This is just one more example of the many hidden subsidies afforded the petroleum industry, letting them dodge responsibility for all the harmful effects of the industry.

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