King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

King Tide this weekend brings water to base of Shoreline Park steps. title=
King Tide this weekend brings water to base of Shoreline Park steps.
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By an edhat reader

Santa Barbara is experiencing a King Tide this weekend. This morning the ocean was up to the bottom of the steps at Shoreline Park. The maximum King Tide Sunday the 5th is at 9:05 am.

If you get a good photo, with an exact time where it was taken, you can submit it for research at the California King Tides Project: https://www.coastal.ca.gov/kingtides/participate.html#web


By Robin

Here are some pix of the super low tide on Saturday. Minus 1.7!


By Patti Gutshall

Best part of King Tides for me are the extreme low tides making for a beautiful sunset.

Moon and star


By Scott

From marina 3 looking at handicapped ramp

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14 Comments

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a-1638674435 Dec 04, 2021 07:20 PM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

As a non-religious person, I prefer the terms solstice tides or equinox tides, rather than king tides, since they are directly related to the solstices and equinoxes and have nothing to do with a mythological figure. These extreme high (and low) tides occur due to astronomical events. Let’s find a better term for El Niño, too.

dukemunson Dec 04, 2021 07:38 PM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

720pm - You perhaps don’t realise, but seemingly should , that King tides have nothing to do with religion…

It’s kind of funny when people go down rabbit holes… whats your El Niño deal?

Seabird Dec 04, 2021 08:17 PM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

@7:20pm, I prefer things, too. The least of our worries is what a king tide or El Nino is named. This is foolish and entitled and, truly, a First World Problem.

GeneralTree Dec 05, 2021 07:35 AM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

The expression originated in Australia, New Zealand and other Pacific nations to describe especially high tides that occur a few times per year. It is now used in North America as well.

ZeroHawk Dec 06, 2021 10:13 AM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

and you have a problem with weather patterns being called a name of royalty and also a name of a historic figure? that's kinda...weird don't you think?

Eggs Ackley Dec 05, 2021 07:03 AM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

Why not queen tide? Mother Earth and all that.
Because the aussies. Should we continue to embrace this sexist term? It’s kinda new and not sure how it caught on here, Some say global warming raised awareness, still, “king” tide? Surely we can do better. Like our politicians.

ZeroHawk Dec 06, 2021 10:12 AM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

wow are you snowflakes griping that the term is too religious or sexist? if so, just go away please. it's a king tide. it's el nino. when you're ruler of the planet, you can change the terms we use for everything across the globe. until then, it is called what it is called.

PitMix Dec 06, 2021 01:04 PM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

Zero, that's exactly the rationale that southerners used to continue using their derogatory terms.
Humans hate change, but the only constant about life is change.

Eggs Ackley Dec 07, 2021 08:32 AM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

I, for one, refuse to use the sexist term “k**g tide”. Go ahead and support sexism and racism ZEROHAWK. Now that you’ve shown your hand: call a spade a spade. I think you are past your best by date.

SBZZ Dec 05, 2021 12:36 PM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

Shrug - they are nothing more than the highest spring (versus neap) tides of the year centered around the winter and summer solstices. But whatever floats your boat.

PitMix Dec 06, 2021 01:05 PM
King Tide up to steps at Shoreline Park

"Higher than normal high tides alone do not necessarily cause coastal flooding. However, they are becoming increasingly impactful due to continued sea level rise. High tide flooding that inundates busy streets, and washes out beaches is more likely to occur during these periods depending on your location along the coast. More severe flooding may result if adverse weather—heavy rains, strong wind or big waves—conditions are present.
https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/high-tide-bulletin/spring-2021/

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