Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions title=
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions
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Source: Santa Barbara County

 
 
When:   4:00 PM, Tuesday, January 16, 2018
 
Where:  La Cumbre Junior High School
              2255 Modoc Road, Santa Barbara
 
What:   The purpose is to provide the community with an update on
             the recovery process, the Local Recovery and Assistance
             Center and planning for the next storm. Representatives from
             various agencies involved will provide an operational briefing
             and be available for questions at its conclusion.
 
The community meeting will be carried live locally on KEYT Channel 3 and KSBY Channel 6, and on the Internet at www.KEYT.com, www.KSBY.com, Santa Barbara County YouTube, and on Santa Barbara County Facebook Live @countyofsb
 
Spanish and ASL interpretation will be available.
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SBPaul Jan 17, 2018 04:15 PM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

The microcell that we got last summer was well beyond 2 inches an hour at my home. This was not an out of this world storm This was a storm that hit a spot that had a record wildfire in a location that has no real way to catch water. I watched it come in and felt it come through. The future storms are going to cause problems and sure .5 in 5 minutes is enough to move things definitely but its not just due the the rain intensity its due to a fairly intense rainfall in an area that could not handle even a drizzle. That being said I think we can all take this as a lesson from this. Calling this a 200 year whatever does no one any good. My neighbor is stupidly digging at our hillside and I am getting the chance to see a cross section of the santa barbara formation. It looks like wavy sand stone as you would expect. This is part of what happens here and we have no idea of how frequently it will or should happen.

CivilEngineer Jan 17, 2018 03:45 PM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

The 200-yr event label comes from how much rain they got in 5 mins, more than 0.5 inches. That's an intensity of 6 inches/hr, which is very high. SB County did an analysis of their historic rain gage data and then used a statistical model to extrapolate that rate to find the recurrence interval. Their estimate was 200 yrs. It's an iffy estimate because you are supposed to have 100-yrs of data to realistically estimate the 200-yr value, but people use short data sets for this because it is all they have. The 200-yr rain combined with the soil and rocks and trees from the burn area created a flood that was pretty big. The FEMA maps that show the 100- and 500-yr clear water flood zones give you a pretty good idea of the areas that are at risk.

Flicka Jan 17, 2018 08:56 AM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

Unfortunately, living along a creek is not a safe place to stay during a flash flood, mandatory warning or not. No one expected this huge 200 year event but it doesn't take much for a creek to jump it's banks during a flash flood, or even during any heavy rain.

John Wiley Jan 16, 2018 07:11 PM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

Aerials of creek clearing on SBitZ.NET posting in a while along with an update on the 101 progress and mud spill closure SB near Patterson. I only caught a couple of minutes of the news conference but cheered aloud when the speaker said Tom Fayram is his hero forever. He's been doing really outstanding work for years, including back when we were all worried about El Nino floods before the fires. We were *amazed* at how much better the creeks look, and at how fast they're opening up the debris catch basins.

SBPaul Jan 16, 2018 05:51 PM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

Can I just say that one of the coolest stories out of this for me is that Montecito elementary are at the Zoo and then cycle to city college for other students. Really cool that they can turn a bad situation into a cool experience. I can only imagine the positive distraction that must be for children at this time. Kudos to those teachers for thinking that up!

a-1571176565 Jan 16, 2018 05:14 PM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

What I want to know is, why has Trump not declared this a disaster?? He hasn't even MENTIONED it! If he had, all the out of work folks could at least get some UI until they can return to work. I can't believe it, how could he not even mention this????????????????

FondofSB Jan 17, 2018 06:24 PM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

And what exactly has G. Brown DONE or SAID ? Has he visited the area ? Of course not ! As he said in Ventura, looking at 1,000 houses burned down : "Well ! This is the new NORMAL" !! Which also mean : "You'd better get usqed to it and get used to more of it because I ain't gonna do nothing about it, nothing to prevent similar future disasters" ..

SBPaul Jan 16, 2018 05:46 PM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

Who do you think authorized the army core of engineers to be here? Who do you think authorized FEMA? I am not a fan of the man but this has nothing to do with politics. If he had said anything about it people would be complaining that he was protecting his golf buddies. UI? In this digital age I have a hard time understanding why someone uses an acronym for "government assistance. You want him to assist but you will complain about how that assistance is delivered. Our state has made a choice to maintain a transit system that is not robust enough to maintain commerce I will admit in a huge disaster. The feds are trying to help get us back on our feet. I bet you would not be happy if the feds came in and started to enforce federal immigration law. You don't get to have you federal cake and eat it too.

SYV_Oaks Jan 16, 2018 05:38 PM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

On Jan. 12th Gov. Brown announced that FEMA did grant California's request to expand the disaster funds already in place since the Thomas Fire. The declaration will now include damage from the flooding and mudslides that damaged Montecito and other Santa Barbara County communities after heavy storms hit areas scorched by the December wildfire. Yes, the POTUS has not publicly said anything about this disaster, only a comment that we are "in his thoughts and prayers" and he is "monitoring the situation" thru a statement by the White House.

420722 Jan 16, 2018 04:29 PM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

If you knew this was going to happen then why weren't you tapping on the windows and crying through the locks for everyone to get out? Easy to point fingers after a disaster. NOBODY knew it was going to be that bad or they would have gotten them all out. Duh.

SBPaul Jan 16, 2018 10:07 AM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

This was a mudflow and you may want to start by getting simple facts like that sorted out before you point fingers at others you expect to give you such obvious information like the way gravity works. I feel for anyone who stayed behind but I was up at 3 am that morning watching the radar because I knew it had the potential to turn very bad. I do not live in a flood zone or near an evacuation area I just had a basic amount of situational awareness and concern for neighbors. I don't want to live in a world where when something like this happens the first reaction people have is why did someone not protect me or tell me to protect myself. The freedom to own property and stay on it comes with responsibility and risk.

CivilEngineer Jan 16, 2018 09:47 AM
Watch Tuesday's Community Meeting for Natural Disaster Questions

Mandantory does't mean you have to get out. It just means that they think you should. Plenty of people stayed behind during the fire and during the flood and there are no criminal penalties for that. Also, they called the whole area above 192 a mandantory zone but it was really the areas along the creeks that were at deadly risk. Their risk map was pretty accurate for this.

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