Phase One: East Beach Habitat Restoration Project Underway

Phase One: East Beach Habitat Restoration Project Underway title=
Phase One: East Beach Habitat Restoration Project Underway
8 Comments
Reads 2823

By the City of Santa Barbara

The East Beach Habitat Restoration Project (Project) will implement the restoration of native plants on sand dunes currently covered by non-native, invasive Ice Plant. Native coastal dune plant species aid in the formation of sand dunes, support local birds and wildlife, and honor Santa Barbara’s unique local ecology.

The Project will be conducted in a 1.13-acre area located at East Beach between the beach sand and the bike path, and between Calle Cesar Chavez and the soccer fields next to Palm Park Beach House. Removal methods include black tarp solarization and hand removal. Solarization is the process of covering unwanted plants with black tarp for several months until the plants dry out. Dried Ice Plant branches will be removed, but their roots will be left in place to help stabilize the sand dunes. Installation of irrigation, native plant species, and wooden fencing will follow.

Phase One: Black tarp solarizing will commence in early December 2022 and cover 0.44 acres of Ice Plant. The drying process is expected to be completed in spring 2023. Irrigation, native plant species, and fencing will be installed prior to May 29, 2023 (Memorial Day).

Phase Two: Black tarp solarizing will commence after September 4, 2023 (Labor Day) and will replace 0.69 acres of Ice Plant. The drying process is expected to be completed in Fall 2023. Irrigation, native plant species, and fencing will be installed prior to December 2023. The project will include a five-year maintenance period to monitor and support plant establishment.

For more information about the Project, please contact Beth Anna Cornett, Senior Planner, at BCornett@SantaBarbaraCA.gov or (805) 564-5537.

Login to add Comments

8 Comments

Show Comments
Snoodely Dec 15, 2022 08:55 AM
Phase One: East Beach Habitat Restoration Project Underway

Wow … I guess that "they" know what they are doing … but, if the native replacement plants will require fencing to protect them, then wouldn’t it just be better to leave the (virtually indestructible) ice plant there?

a-1671123078 Dec 15, 2022 08:51 AM
Phase One: East Beach Habitat Restoration Project Underway

Lets see; need to find new ways to spend City money? Ice plant? Really? I'm 71, have lived on these beaches my whole life and have never considered ice plant a problem. As a matter of fact, when all plants are becoming brown and dying, ice plant appears to mostly remain green and appealing. After all, Santa Barbara still needs to Look appealing on the outside, don't we? Also, it is not picky under bare feet when one has no shoes and is trying to get to the beach from the sidewalk. And yes, it does stabilize the sand a keep high tides from eating into the coast.

Luvaduck Dec 15, 2022 07:00 AM
Phase One: East Beach Habitat Restoration Project Underway

Doesn't it stabilize the sand and keep high tides from eating into the coast? Not all invasive species are bad. Pampas grass should go because it spreads. Ice plant? Not so much, doesn't obscure the scenery and serves a purpose.

patrick Dec 14, 2022 05:01 PM
Phase One: East Beach Habitat Restoration Project Underway

Having seen the ice plant for so long, I hadn't thought they' make the effort to do this habitat restoration. However, as a fan of native species, I am in favor of this. So far, I've yet to ride off the bike path, so I'm sure this will enhance the quality of my life.

Please Login or Register to comment on this.