Not Your Ordinary Cruise Ship!

Not Your Ordinary Cruise Ship! title=
Not Your Ordinary Cruise Ship!
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By Chuck Cagara

The world's largest residential cruise ship, "The World," is currently visiting Santa Barbara.

"The World" typically accommodates 150-200 guests who live aboard their "residence" and cruise for approximately one year.

 
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Odds Bodkin Sep 19, 2017 08:24 PM
Not Your Ordinary Cruise Ship!

The smallest studio apartments are approx. 370 sq. ft. while the largest 3-bedroom residence runs to nearly 3500 sq. ft. Boston Globe did a nice feature on the ship several years ago.

oceandrew Sep 19, 2017 05:19 PM
Not Your Ordinary Cruise Ship!

Well, I suppose the alternative is a 52ft catamaran for that #1M and with a cruising kitty of $6k a month you get to choose where you want to go next. AND you get to invite a couple, or two, of your best friends to come along with you. That might be all one needs to stay fit and live longer.

tagdes Sep 20, 2017 03:17 PM
Not Your Ordinary Cruise Ship!

To each his or her own...as on a several day trip across any of the several oceans some folks enjoy having a few things not commonly found on a 52 ft catamaran like several restaurants, bars with music and dance floors, spas, swimming pools, theaters and pretty well staffed medical facilities.

John Wiley Sep 19, 2017 04:02 PM
Not Your Ordinary Cruise Ship!

The wiki page (MS The World) is fascinating https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_The_World and says there's an average of 150–200 residents and guests aboard with a crew of 280. It's smaller and thus perhaps more seaworthy than most of the cruise ships we've seen anchored here, but maybe less attractive for those prone to seasickness? According to other online sources, for about the $1M cost of a SB home you can buy in and travel the planet (they even did the NW Passage). That $1M buys you 370 square feet or so. Then you pay "rent" of about $6k a month. Would be interesting to talk with some of the few residents who live aboard all year, or even the majority who come aboard periodically.

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