Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases title=
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases
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Update by Santa Barbara Public Health Department
April 13, 2020
 

Santa Barbara County Public Health Department (PHD) reports an additional 17 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the county today, April 13. The total number of confirmed cases is 284.

Seven cases [of the new 17 cases] are people incarcerated at the Federal Prison in Lompoc, CA.

One hundred twenty-four people are recovering at home, 40 are recovering in a hospital, 15 of whom are in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), 109 have fully recovered, and nine are pending an update. Two deaths have been reported.

Please visit Santa Barbara County’s coronavirus web page for other preparedness resources and updates at https://publichealthsbc.org/.

Cottage Health Numbers - April 13, 2020

Below is a status update as of April 13, 2020. 

·         Cottage Health is caring for a total of 185 patients across all campuses.

·         143 are acute care patients; 230 acute care beds remain available.  

·         In surge planning, capacity is identified for adding 270 acute care beds.

·         Of the 143 patients, 11 patients are on ventilators; 51 ventilators remain available (adult, pediatric and neonatal ventilators)

·         Of the 143 patients, 16 are in isolation with COVID-19 symptoms; 13 are confirmed COVID-19 positive.

·         Of 16 patients in isolation, 10 patients are in critical care.

·         Cottage has collected 1,723 cumulative test samples: 140 resulted in positive, 1,539 resulted in negative, and 44 are pending. In most of these tests, patients did not require hospital admission.

Additional updates:

Cottage CareNow to offer free online visits to community for COVID-19 symptoms
For the health of our community and patients, Cottage CareNow will begin offering free online virtual visits for individuals with COVID-19 symptoms.  Individuals with COVID-19 symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath) or upper respiratory symptoms (sore throat, runny nose, nasal congestion), can visit cottagehealth.org/carenow for a free initial online diagnosis. This free online visit is for upper respiratory or COVID-19 related conditions.

Food Donations:

Many community businesses have generously offered donations of food for Cottage employees, and we greatly appreciate these efforts to recognize healthcare workers during this time. For the safety of community members and employees, our hospitals can only accept food donations that are scheduled and approved in advance. Businesses offering to donate food for hospital employees are asked to contactKate Greene at [email protected]. To ensure safe food handling, prepackaged items and foods prepared in a commercially approved kitchen are welcome when delivered in sealed/closed containers and scheduled through Kate Greene. Food produced in home kitchens or non-commercial settings cannot be accepted.

Other Gifts and Support:
Gifts of flowers for healthcare workers currently cannot be accepted at Cottage hospitals.

Digital cheer cards for patients are available at cottagehealth.org/patients-visitors/cheer-cards/

Financial contributions to the Cottage Emergency Response Fund directly support immediate and emerging needs for patient care, supplies and resources, and support of healthcare workers responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. Information on this fund is at cottagehealth.org/donate/


Update by Santa Barbara Public Health Department
April 12, 2020
 

Santa Barbara County Public Health Department (PHD) reports an additional three (3) confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the county today. The total number of confirmed cases is 267.

114 people are recovering at home, 39 are recovering in a hospital, 17 of whom are in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), 105 have fully recovered, and seven (7) are pending an update. Two (2) deaths have been reported.

Please visit Santa Barbara County’s coronavirus web page for other preparedness resources and updates at https://publichealthsbc.org/.

For general questions about COVID-19 and precautions currently recommended by Santa Barbara County Public Health, residents may call the 2-1-1 Call Center 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by dialing 2-1-1 if calling from within the county; or (800) 400-1572 if calling from outside the area.


Update by Santa Barbara Public Health Department
April 11, 2020
 

Santa Barbara County Public Health Department (PHD) reports an additional four confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the county today. The total number of  confirmed cases is 264.

One outbreak of COVID-19 has been identified in a congregate living facility in Santa Barbara County at the Federal Correctional Institution in Lompoc, CA. 40 confirmed cases are persons who are incarcerated and 14 are employees.

112 people are recovering at home, 39 are recovering in a hospital, 17 of whom are in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), 105 have fully recovered, and six are pending an update. Two deaths have been reported.

Please visit Santa Barbara County’s coronavirus web page for other preparedness resources and updates at https://publichealthsbc.org/.

For general questions about COVID-19 and precautions currently recommended by Santa Barbara County Public Health, residents may call the county’s call center at (833) 688-5551.


Source: Public Health Department
April 10, 2020
 

Santa Barbara County Public Health Department (PHD) reports an additional 17 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the county today. The total number of confirmed cases is 260.

Although most cases of COVID-19 exhibit mild or moderate symptoms, PHD recommends additional measures to prevent exposure among vulnerable people, including the elderly and those with underlying health conditions (such as diabetes, cancer, immunodeficiency, asthma, COPD and others). PHD recommends that residents, especially those who are vulnerable:

  • Stay home except for essential tasks. Ensure you have a two-week supply of medication on hand.
  • When engaging in essential tasks away from home, remain 6 feet away from others and wear a facial covering.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water regularly.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Keep surfaces clean by wiping them down with a household disinfectant,

Information for the 17 new confirmed cases can be found below.

Ages of new confirmed cases reported:

0-17 0
18-29 2
30-49 9
50-69 3
70+ 3

Locations of new cases reported:

South County Unincorporated Area includes communities of Montecito, Summerland and the City of Carpinteria 0
City of Santa Barbara and the unincorporated area of Mission Canyon 2
City of Goleta 0
Community of Isla Vista 0
Unincorporated Area of the Goleta Valley and Gaviota 0
Santa Ynez Valley including the Cities of Solvang & Buellton, and the communities of Santa Ynez, Los Alamos, Los Olivos and Ballard 0
City of Lompoc and the communities of Mission Hills and Vandenberg Village *11
City of Santa Maria 4
Community of Orcutt 0
Unincorporated Areas of Sisquoc, Casmalia, Garey, Cuyama, New Cuyama, and the City of Guadalupe 0

*Six (6) new cases are persons who are incarcerated at the Federal Correctional Institution in Lompoc, CA and is part of the identified outbreak.

Six confirmed new cases are persons who are incarcerated at the Federal Prison in Lompoc. Of the 60 cases included in the outbreak, 46 cases are persons who are incarcerated and 14 cases are employees at the Prison.

122 people are recovering at home, 40 are recovering in a hospital, 18 of whom are in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), 90 have fully recovered, and six are pending an update. Two deaths have been reported.

Please visit Santa Barbara County’s coronavirus web page for other preparedness resources and updates at https://publichealthsbc.org/.

For general questions about COVID-19 and precautions currently recommended by Santa Barbara County Public Health, residents may call the county’s call center at (833) 688-5551.

Ventura & SLO Counties

Ventura County is reporting 24 new cases with a total of 298. Of the 298 confirmed cases, 177 are actively under quarantine, 111 have recovered, 59 have ever been hospitalized, and there have been 10 deaths. Of the 10 deaths, the ages range from 71 to 89 with 5 males and 5 females.

In San Luis Obispo County, there are 107 confirmed cases. Of the 107 cases, 20 are recovering at home, 83 have fully recovered, 3 are hospitalized, and there's been 1 death.


COVID-19 Update from Cottage Health -- April 10, 2020

Below is a status update as of April 10, 2020. 

·       Cottage Health is caring for a total of 178 patients across all campuses.

·       133 are acute care patients; 240 acute care beds remain available.  

·       In surge planning, capacity is identified for adding 270 acute care beds.

·       Of the 133 patients, 12 patients are on ventilators; 49 ventilators remain available (adult, pediatric and neonatal ventilators)

·       Of the 133 patients, 17 are in isolation with COVID-19 symptoms; 13 are confirmed COVID-19 positive.

·       Of 17 patients in isolation, 6 patients are in critical care.

·       Cottage has collected 1,595 cumulative test samples: 120 resulted in positive, 1,327 resulted in negative, and 148 are pending. In most of these tests, patients did not require hospital admission.

A Message from Cottage Health to Our Community:

On behalf of our dedicated healthcare workers providing care to those members of our community with COVID-19 and care to those who rely on us for other needs, thank you for the sacrifices you are making to stay home, protect yourselves and others, and flatten the projected patient curve.  At Cottage Health, we continue to provide essential hospital care at all of our hospitals as we plan for future increase in COVID-19 patients. We are extremely grateful for the outpouring of community support we’ve received through letters of encouragement, donations of protective equipment, and other contributions. At Cottage Health, our hospitals are open, and physicians and employees are caring for patients around the clock.

Following is an update on activities at Cottage Health:

  • COVID-19 Patients – The number of patients at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital being treated with COVID-19 has been relatively stable over the past 10 days at 15-20 inpatients, roughly half of whom are in critical care. All COVID-19 positive patients are in isolation units with negative air pressure.  We report this daily to the county, state, and federal agencies and to the media. 
  • Professional Healthcare Staff – For several weeks now, physicians, nurses, therapists, and other healthcare workers at Cottage and throughout the county have been on the front lines, day in and out, taking care of patients with COVID-19 and the many others who need our help.  These are the heroes of our time. I continue to be inspired by their dedication and their courage.
     
  • Bed Capacity and Surge Planning - Patient census is down significantly as a result of cancelling all non-urgent elective procedures. In recent weeks, Cottage Health has been providing care for an average of 160 inpatients, leaving over 200 beds in the system for immediate response to a COVID-19 surge.  In addition, we have a surge plan that could add, by converting conference rooms and other non-traditional patient care space, as many as 270 additional beds and cots. We have already relocated our Eye Center and Infusion Suite to make additional space within Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital for acute care beds. Last month we created dedicated isolation units for care of patients with COVID-19. The centralized point of care helps us conserve protective supplies and equipment for health care workers.
     
  • Personal Protective Equipment – The international shortage of PPE is in the news daily, and assuring protection of patients and staff is a top priority for Cottage Health.  Much work has been done not only to procure needed N95 and surgical masks, gowns, gloves, face shields and other protective equipment, but also to identify methods to produce PPE locally and to safely reprocess certain materials. We have had setbacks. A supply of N95s recently delivered from the State disaster cache to hospitals in the county had degraded over time and was unusable. However, with each challenge we keep moving forward. Because of the immediate, expert and innovative response from our local partners including UCSB, local tech companies and many others, we have received our first shipment of locally engineered and produced face shields for caregivers performing the highest risk procedures.  More are coming in the weeks ahead.
     
  • COVID-19 Predictive Models - The surge models being projected indicate that we may have a long road ahead. The peak may be many weeks away, and we are working closely with the Santa Barbara County leadership and area hospitals to prepare. The county is leading the effort to identify sites for adding beds outside the hospital walls.  Other efforts are underway to reach out to additional healthcare workers to provide support. If a surge happens — and we hope it won’t -- the plan will be to keep the most critical patients within the hospital and have capacity at other sites to provide supportive care for the less critically ill.
     
  • Testing – Current laboratory testing capacity allows only for testing of patients meeting certain criteria.  These include symptomatic individuals in congregate care facilities, hospitalized patients, and healthcare workers. Our affiliate, Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories, is developing new testing options with rapid turnaround time to further expand the community’s capacity.
     
  • Screening – We are now screening everyone who enters the hospitals, including physicians and employees, for symptoms of illness. All of our employees are now wearing masks in the hospitals whenever they are interacting with the public or in a clinical area. For those in non-clinical areas with lower risk of exposure, the handmade masks our community provided are filling a need, and we are grateful.
     
  • Visitors - Once it became necessary to restrict visitors to the hospitals, we found different ways to make sure patients feel supported and can connect with loved ones outside the hospital.  Cameras in our neonatal unit allow families to see their newborns 24/7, and technology is offered for patients who need devices to stay connected to family outside the hospital.
     
  • Telehealth – Many of our medical staff and other care providers are using telemedicine to reduce the number of people entering a patient room. This effort is twofold – to prevent the spread of germs and to preserve much-needed protective equipment and medical supplies for patient care teams.  Our virtual platform, Cottage CareNow, provides 24/7 rapid assessment of symptoms for low acuity illnesses, including an initial screening tool for COVID-19.
     
  • Community Support – We thank the community for responding so generously in donating medical supplies at our collection centers. Over 100 individuals and organizations have donated everything from facemasks to gloves to isolation gowns for healthcare workers. We are also grateful to those who have donated funds to support healthcare workers in need of child care and other services. We’ve received numerous requests inquiring how best to support our staff and other emerging needs. We have now created the Cottage Emergency Response Fund. Please direct inquiries to David Dietrich, Vice President for Advancement: [email protected].
     
  • Information - On cottagehealth.org, you can view daily COVID-19 updates as well as videos of clinical updates by medical staff leaders at Cottage.
     
  • Partnerships – The healthcare community in this county is working very closely together. Led by incredibly skilled medical staff leaders, our area hospitals, Sansum Clinic, the Santa Barbara Neighborhood Clinics, and the Santa Barbara Public Health Department are collaborating daily on issues before us and planning for the weeks to come. It is a privilege to work with such talented professionals. 

Our hospitals and medical staff leaders have been laser-focused in this window to prepare, doing what we need to do to ensure we can continue to provide care to the community today and in the weeks ahead, and to protect our frontline healthcare workers providing that care. I am grateful to be a part of this community, and for the exceptional team of healthcare professionals at Cottage Health.

Sincerely,
Ron Werft
President & CEO
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104 Comments

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a-1586890095 Apr 14, 2020 11:48 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

"According to Santa Barbara County Public Health, ocean water near streams and drains may have a higher chance of carrying COVID-19 and being infectious."

ChemicalSuperFreak Apr 15, 2020 03:52 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Can you send the link where you distinctly quoted that statement? I've searched, but found nothing. I'm personally concerned because I know of some homeless encampments right on the beach, below the Ellwood Mesa, and I've had no response from the Sheriff, after emailing photos.

LCP112233 Apr 14, 2020 10:21 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

It would be interesting to see how the recent cleanliness and social distancing has altered the flu numbers. Those numbers would should also be nose diving.

a-1586888522 Apr 14, 2020 11:22 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Trauma incidents have dropped, too. Many fewer people driving, out at bars drinking, etc. There are certainly quite a few secondary silver linings.

PitMix Apr 14, 2020 10:21 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

About 50 million of us are over the age of 65 in the US. About 10% of that population will die if they get SARS2. That is 5 million if we let this spread unchecked through the population. Tell me again how this is just like the flu?

a-1586918904 Apr 14, 2020 07:48 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

This has nothing to do with natural selection. How cruel of you to suggest that vulnerability of age means that we could accept death by a disease. The Spanish Flue of 1918 targeted the young and healthy. Polio targeted children and young adults. Are you suggesting that modern society should accept death by disease as "natural selection". You could argue that states with governors who do not protect their populations are demonstrating a type of selection, refusal to follow science and common sense results in death.

a-1586885820 Apr 14, 2020 10:37 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

I am by no means an expert, but what you've described appears to be natural selection at work. Just think how bad things would be if travel restrictions and social distancing had not been put into place.

a-1586882529 Apr 14, 2020 09:42 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

The comments about blaming China and how Sars 2 (Covid 19) are the same as the annual flu, repeated over and over are surprising. As numerous writers have tried to inform, this novel virus acts differently and is very deadly. China didn't know what they had intially , a "novel" virus and worked to contain it. A lab in Wuhan tried to warn the U.S. in January (they were an organization originally funded by the U.S.) but were ignored . Where is the blame and misinformation repeated over and over here, coming from? This won't get hospitals the needed supplies to treat the ill, get testing done, or quarantine the ill, or even eventually get the economy running. Only facts work when it comes to science, and action.

a-1586919110 Apr 14, 2020 07:51 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Chinese propanda that the U.S. used to have a pandemic response that funded labs throughout the world until the funding was taken away in January?. No, that is the fact. The propaganda is the blaming of other countries and world organizations that tried to get the U.S. to prepare for a pandemic starting in January, but the government of the U.S. decided to declare it a "hoax" . That is fact.

PitMix Apr 14, 2020 10:14 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Does sound like Chinese propaganda. Luckily we have a sort of free press here in the US and so the truth is out there for anyone who wants to know.

ChemicalSuperFreak Apr 14, 2020 09:57 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

BS! China knew, lied to the WHO and murdered the whistleblower. Your phrasing is suspicious ("As numerous writers have tried to inform"), so your post is immediately suspicious and sounds like Chinese propaganda.

a-1586883116 Apr 14, 2020 09:51 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

I agree with you. Kudos to China for everything that they did and continue to do to help everyone in the world. Xiè Xie China!

a-1586874262 Apr 14, 2020 07:24 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

No matter what your politics, you have to be glad that the official predictions that a minimum 100,000 to 250,000 people in the US would perish did not come true. The steps that were taken by Washington and individual state governments definitely reduced the number of lives lost. The country and world will soon open back up again, and we've all learned our lesson. Don't let up people. Keep a positive attitude, and let's move on. Today I celebrate life, and can breath a bit easier.

macpuzl Apr 13, 2020 09:47 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Today's "presidential" briefing:
==========================================================================
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52276004
==========================================================================
At least our local briefings contain useful information.

Shasta Guy Apr 13, 2020 06:19 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Goleta + Santa Barbara = 41. Santa Maria + Orcutt + Lompoc (exclu. prison) = 139. Goleta & SB are fairing well, but north county locations have a lot of work to do to bend the curve.

a-1586822689 Apr 13, 2020 05:04 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

It certainly seems that each weekend the numbers are very low, and then on Monday they jump back up. For instance, today's numbers are up 17, with only 3 yesterday. Is it possible the collection and reporting of information is poor on the weekend? Just wondering!

bigone Apr 13, 2020 04:26 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

I'm curious to know what the two camps here think about COVID-19 and the "regular flu". Should we shut down all "non-essential" businesses and the economy and put in place "Stay At Home" orders for the "regular flu" season every time it occurs, since it has been proven to kill 20-60k people in the U.S. every year? Or ignore that concept due to "projected deaths..... could be as high as 1 million (since revised to 60,000)" for COVID-19 if not for extreme measures"? Does one matter more than the other in terms of what kills people and where do we draw the line? I really don't want statements that say 19 is far more easily transmitted and deadly than seasonal flu - both COVIDS kill people, and mostly for those with compromised health situations. And I hope amidst all this bickering over still-to-be-compiled data and proven facts that it does not distract both America and the world about the incredible and unprecedented harm the Chinese government has caused and what must be done to prevent or severely curtail these type of occurrences in the future. We seem to have a short memory regarding other deadly zoonotic viruses that have emanated from China, such as the Avian Flu and SARS.

a-1586914169 Apr 14, 2020 06:29 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

@MACPUZL - it's kind of silly the way, the second any of your comments post, there's a thumbs up....within seconds! You must have quite a fan club that jumps on your every word!

sbmh2015 Apr 14, 2020 09:41 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Bigone...None ??? You are insane. And, now I know why. "MSM" is a term used by a certain segment of our population. You don't think hospitals are having an issue ? Then why have they stopped elective procedures which are their main revenue stream ? Because of "MSM". NO. Because Covid19 is highly contagious and because they need beds for it. I could give you more examples but you clearly are in the "it's a flu" camp. Stay there. You know not what you speak of.

ChemicalSuperFreak Apr 14, 2020 09:38 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

BIGONE, Cool! Great for her and her apparently equally intelligent husband! She sounds smart. It's a small community and I'm always happy to hear about or chat with biochemists. Before IMDb took down their boards, I chatted with Neal Burnette, the inventor of the Western blot. That was like meeting a rock star for me.

bigone Apr 14, 2020 09:22 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

CSF, you probably do know her. However, for the sake of privacy and probably Edhat's rules, I can't give out her name. However, she is associated with a university located in Orange County, as is her husband, a doctor who specializes in microbiology. Today's "curve" looks encouraging and obviously let's hope it continues in that trend while continuing to practice safe and logical guidelines.

SBRoses Apr 14, 2020 09:10 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

The flu does not have a 2-3% kill rate. This is not the flu. Stop comparing it. It is completely noninterchangeable. The death projections for COVID in the USA with zero adjustment to daily life is as high as 1-2 MILLION people. The current strains of flu kill at most .1%? Yes, if the flu mutates and we get a strain with a 2-3% kill rate, you can rest assured we will be taking the same actions as we are taking now with COVID. The difference is we would be farther along in vaccine capabilities. And remember there is a vaccine which at least confers SOME protection against the flu. We have zero vaccines for coronaviruses.

ChemicalSuperFreak Apr 13, 2020 10:37 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

BIGONE, YOU NOW HAVE MY COMPLETE INTEREST!!! Please tell me about your beloved youngest cousin’s research in oligonucleotides!!! I wonder if we know each other. No patents to my name, but I’ve published several articles in journals such Biochemistry and PNAS on the subject of oligonucleotides. Due tell, what has she published and what you know??? As far as China, yes, I hope they pay a huge price, because they are 100% responsible for this. I’m with you on that.

macpuzl Apr 13, 2020 09:11 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

BO - When you post a comment with such a glaring demonstration that you are unaware of what's going on in the world today, it's really hard to believe you're not trying out for some sort of sick comedy gig.

bigone Apr 13, 2020 08:45 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

7:59: What hospitals are being "completely overwhelmed"? None. I have no idea where you are getting your information from, but it's probably from the MSM. You haven't answered any of my questions, either.

sbmh2015 Apr 13, 2020 07:59 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Bigone...You are absolutely, positively misinformed. I don't know where you are getting your news from but it has been repeatedly proven that comparing Covid19 to the flu is nonsense. Ask yourself...when was the last time the flu completely overwhelmed hospital systems ? I'll help. NEVER. The R0 value of this virus is almost 6 with no social distancing. And there is no vaccine or medication to take for this virus. Several more facts about the differences are available if you look. So, stop your comparison. This is not the flu

bigone Apr 13, 2020 07:59 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

CSF, certainly you are an expert in your field and no disrespect was/is intended. It might interest you that my beloved youngest cousin is a highly recognized and awarded biomedical scientist in antiviral oligonucleotides with various patents attributed to her. She and I have had numerous discussions about COVID-19 and the "minutiae" details I mentioned. But in the questions I am asking everyone, sometimes it might be better to implement the old saying "to see the forest for the trees." No one has yet addressed concerns about China, what do we do to stem future problems arising from their government, what deaths are directly attributable to the virus itself or instead compounded by underlying conditions, and, importantly, what would we do better or differently in hindsight or in the future, including developing vaccines, and curtailing human rights and freedoms? And do any of us dare to bring up Darwinism in this discussion?

ChemicalSuperFreak Apr 13, 2020 07:10 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

BIGONE, The minutiae as you put it, are deadly serious to me and what I do for a living. I take this virus seriously and treat it with respect, including its classification and mechanism of infection. You cite a litany of symptoms, which are common to a lot of disorders, and are independent of the etiology. Without understanding the underlying etiology of said symptoms you will not find a cure. At the molecular level, which is my specialty, there are striking differences. Please respect this.

bigone Apr 13, 2020 06:39 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Chemicalsuperfreak, not sure what your point is here, but thanks for the technical correction. I am not here to dispute the minutiae.
My point is:
Both influenza and COVID-19 can:
Cause fever, sometimes quite high, cough (but usually with mucous in the case of COVID), body aches, fatigue and sometimes vomiting and diarrhea.
Be mild or severe, but rarely fatal, unless the respiratory system is collapsing which noth can cause.
Result in pneumonia
Be spread from person to person through coughing, sneezing or talking, and both can be spread before symptoms appear.
Yes, the flu can be caused by a number of different strains of influenza viruses.
COVID-19 is caused by one virus, as we now know, the new 2019 coronavirus.
And as you know, individuals sometimes get infected with other human coronaviruses, such as 229E, NL63, OC43 and HKU1. In fact, most people get infected with one of these at some point in their life, although rarely lethal.
But your correction on the differences doesn't address my question(s):
Since both are lethal, do we enact the same measures to curtail one over the other? If your point is that mentioning them in the same questions is like comparing apples and oranges, they both end up with possibly the same result. And do we eventually penalize the Chinese government for this or just let them slide until another virus originates in their country, whether one family of lethal phylum or another?

Ahchooo Apr 13, 2020 06:31 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

The issue is that none of us have immunity to this new coronavirus so it spreads fast, resulting in lots of sickness over a very short period of time. The whole point of the shutdown is to slow down the infection rate so that our hospitals are not overwhelmed. The hope is that by slowing the rate of infection we can properly care for those of us who are hard-hit. What if all you needed was a bit of oxygen, but you died because there was no room at the hospital? Also, to reiterate, influenza and coronavirus are in completely different families.

ChemicalSuperFreak Apr 13, 2020 05:15 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

@BIGONE: You wrote, "I really don't want statements that say 19 is far more easily transmitted and deadly than seasonal flu - both COVIDS kill people, and mostly for those with compromised health situations." They are not both "COVIDS". Influenza (A, B, and C) and COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) belong to two completely different families. The influenzas belong to the Orthomyxoviridae, and the coronaviruses belong to the Coronaviridae. They're not even in the same phylum. They're are actually more different from each other than humans are from frogs.

macpuzl Apr 13, 2020 11:58 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Here come the uninformed but unabashed posters with their insane message again - "Social isolation is working to save lives! We've gotta stop doing that!"

Rinconer Apr 13, 2020 08:19 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Last year, the CDC published their annual estimate that 20,00 - 60,000 people in the U.S. would die this year of the regular seasonal flu.
U.S. death toll = 20,000.

Ahchooo Apr 13, 2020 04:22 PM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

The regular flu deaths are spread out over several months. COVID-19 deaths are all coming at once, on top of regular flu. That’s the problem. What we are doing by staying home is spreading out the infection, not stopping it. Final death count is unknown and not relevant right now.

LCP112233 Apr 13, 2020 11:03 AM
Monday Update: 284 Total Coronavirus Cases

Except during a regular flu season we are all out and about functioning normally. Going to movies, concerts, restaurants, bars etc.

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