Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

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Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11
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Source: Santa Barbara County Education Office

Governor Newsom announced today that after March 11, 2022, in schools and child care facilities, masks will not be required but will be strongly recommended.

In addition, starting March 1, 2022, masks will no longer be required for unvaccinated individuals in general settings, but will be strongly recommended for all individuals in most indoor settings.

Masks will still be required for everyone in high transmission settings like public transit, emergency shelters, health care settings, correctional facilities, homeless shelters and long-term care facilities. As always, local jurisdictions may have additional requirements beyond the state guidance.

View the full press release here.

California Health & Human Services Agency (CalHHS) Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly will host a video conference today to provide an update on COVID-19 in California.

The update will be streamed live on the California Department of Public Health YouTube account.

  • WHO: Dr. Mark Ghaly, CalHHS Secretary

  • WHEN: Monday, February 28, 2022 1:00 p.m. PST


Governors Newsom, Brown and Inslee Announce Updated Health Guidance

Published: Feb 28, 2022
Source: Office of Governor Gavin Newsom

With declining case rates and hospitalizations across the West, California, Oregon and Washington are moving together to update their masking guidance. After 11:59 p.m. on March 11, California, Oregon and Washington will adopt new indoor mask policies and move from mask requirements to mask recommendations in schools.

State policies do not change federal requirements, which still include masks on public transit.

Statement from California Governor Gavin Newsom: “California continues to adjust our policies based on the latest data and science, applying what we’ve learned over the past two years to guide our response to the pandemic. Masks are an effective tool to minimize spread of the virus and future variants, especially when transmission rates are high. We cannot predict the future of the virus, but we are better prepared for it and will continue to take measures rooted in science to keep California moving forward.”

In California, starting March 1, masks will no longer be required for unvaccinated individuals, but will be strongly recommended for all individuals in most indoor settings. After March 11, in schools and child care facilities, masks will not be required but will be strongly recommended. Masks will still be required for everyone in high transmission settings like public transit, emergency shelters, health care settings, correctional facilities, homeless shelters and long-term care facilities. As always, local jurisdictions may have additional requirements beyond the state guidance.

Statement from Oregon Governor Kate Brown: “Two years ago today, we identified Oregon’s first case of COVID-19. As has been made clear time and again over the last two years, COVID-19 does not stop at state borders or county lines. On the West Coast, our communities and economies are linked. Together, as we continue to recover from the Omicron surge, we will build resiliency and prepare for the next variant and the next pandemic. As we learn to live with this virus, we must remain vigilant to protect each other and prevent disruption to our schools, businesses, and communities––with a focus on protecting our most vulnerable and the people and communities that have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19.”

In Oregon, the Oregon Health Authority rules requiring masks in indoor public places and schools will be lifted after 11:59 p.m. on March 11. Other state and federal requirements, such as those for health care settings, public transit, and other specialized settings, will remain in place for a period of time.

Statement from Washington Governor Jay Inslee: “We’ve continued to monitor data from our state Department of Health, and have determined we are able to adjust the timing of our statewide mask requirement. While this represents another step forward for Washingtonians, we must still be mindful that many within our communities remain vulnerable. Many businesses and families will continue choosing to wear masks, because we’ve learned how effective they are at keeping one another safe. As we transition to this next phase, we will continue to move forward together carefully and cautiously.”

In Washington, indoor mask requirements will be lifted as of 11:59 p.m. on March 11. This new date does not change any other aspect of the updated mask requirements Inslee announced last week. Masks will still be required in certain settings including health care, corrections facilities and long-term care facilities. The Washington State Department of Health will be issuing new guidance for K-12 schools next week so schools can prepare to implement updated safety protocols.

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dukemunson Feb 28, 2022 08:51 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

There has never been a surge in Paediatric cases… just stop. You can keep masking as long as you want, but stop. There hasn’t been a paediatric surge in anything other than mental health issues… that surge however has been real and debilitating.

a-1646112003 Feb 28, 2022 09:20 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

What, then do you call around 2,000 COVID cases a month among 0-17 since September, compared to only 4,000 total in the months before that point, if not a surge? Maybe tunnel vision is a mental health issue?

And just wait for the surge that will come with unmasking.

mm1970 Mar 01, 2022 09:32 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

Obviously we saw a surge last month because Omicron is incredibly contagious. Sports were happening, school was happening, and plenty of folks gathered for the holidays. Plus: families are very much "over COVID". I know a few folks who had Omicron who don't know where they caught it because they work from home and generally only go out to go to the grocery store.

On the flip side, our numbers are down. Omicron is less serious than prior versions of the virus. Vaccinations are free and available. Both my kids are vaxxed and the teenager is boosted. The teen managed to avoid the COVID high school spread - then again, we use the M95i masks. Of course some of it is just dumb luck and being a family of introverts.

On March 14, my kids will be sent to school with masks...in their backpacks. "Hey, if someone is sneezing or blowing their nose in your class, put your mask on!"

Peace out.

sacjon Mar 01, 2022 11:14 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

I'm confused here. Duke and Fernald are always on the same side of this, yet one says, "[the] virus spread was rampant in schools even with masks[,]" yet the other says, "[t]here has never been a surge in Paediatric [sic] cases..."

So, which was it?

dukemunson Mar 01, 2022 03:13 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

And by rampant I mean the same as the community at large...which was obviously rampant with Omicron! The basis for closing schools for longer than a month or two was terrible. The basis for masking kids at school for the last year has been terrible. And the failure to put up some tents and/or outdoor structures (as well as plant some gardens and double PE time) still makes no sense. GUSD took over 10 million in reopening funds in Summer of 2020...and then didn't reopen till March!

mm1970 Mar 01, 2022 09:26 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

Do you have specific data to show that virus spread was rampant in schools with masks? I'd be curious to see it. From what I've read, contact tracing (back when it was being done) was showing that the virus cases were high at schools, but that the infections were coming from outside school. High case counts aren't the same as "spread in school".

a-1646156493 Mar 01, 2022 09:41 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

We've known for over a year the amount of covid spread in schools is lower than the community at large. Meaning schools were always safer places and should never have been closed. The CDC knew this, closing schools was specially called out in their pre-covid pandemic plan as something that should not be shutdown for more than 1-2 weeks in the worst case scenario (worst case pandemic scenario was 5+million American perish). Unfortunately we decided to throw the book out the window and try this never before tried shutdown "15 days to slow the spread" and we all know how catastrophic a failure that was. one of the many links: https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2021/01/scientists-highlight-low-risk-covid-19-spread-schools#:~:text=Overall%20coronavirus%20incidence%20in%20the,to%2040%25%20during%20that%20time.

Sun Feb 28, 2022 09:52 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

Poison centers around the country sound alarm on chemical in some COVID-19 at-home tests
https://www.yahoo.com/news/poison-centers-around-country-sound-202946599.html

CINCINNATI — Be aware: That COVID-19 test kit in your home could contain a toxic substance that may be harmful to your children and you.

The substance is sodium azide, and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center's Drug and Poison Information Center has seen a surge in calls about exposures to the chemical since more people started self-testing for COVID-19 at home.

Fifty million U.S. households have received some version of the test kits, although it's not clear how many contain sodium azide. The government has sent 200 million of the kits, with about 85% of initial orders filled, officials said at a White House briefing last week.

"We started getting our first exposures to these test kits around early November," said Sheila Goertemoeller, pharmacist and clinical toxicologist for the center. "It was, really, all ages." The calls to the local center mirror what's been happening nationally. The Upstate New York Poison Center and West Texas Poison Center have warned of similar issues.

What is sodium azide?

Sodium azide, often used as a preservative, is a liquid reagent in several of the COVID-19 test kits, she said. Poison Control's National Capital Poison Center said the chemical is colorless, tasteless and odorless, and it is mainly used in car airbags and as a pest control agent.

Ingesting it can cause low blood pressure, which can result in dizziness, headaches or palpitations. Exposure to it can also cause skin, eye or nostril irritation. Large amounts of exposure to sodium azide can cause severe health threats, leading to convulsions, loss of consciousness, lung injury, respiratory failure leading to death, the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention notes.

"Sodium azide is a very potent poison, and ingestion of relatively low doses can cause significant toxicity," Poison Control said. "The extraction vials do look like small squeeze bottles or eye droppers. Some people may accidentally confuse them with medications and apply the drops into their eyes or nose, which may cause irritation. People also may spill it on their skin which can cause skin irritation or chemical burns. Small children may accidentally swallow the contents of the vial or choke on the vial’s small cap."

Several poison centers throughout the United States have reported sodium azide exposures from the COVID-19 test kits. Goertemoeller estimated there have been 200-plus reported cases from the 55 poison centers nationwide.

The Cincinnati Children's based Drug and Poison Information Center has logged 38 cases of sodium azide exposure, with cases peaking in January, around the time that the omicron variant triggered a high number of COVID-19 cases, Goertemoeller said. Adults exposed generally have experienced mild skin irritation, which can get worse if the area isn't washed thoroughly, she said.

Nationwide Children's Central Ohio Poison Center in Columbus also reported seeing an "uptick" in cases, as well, a spokeswoman said. The center did not immediately have a number of cases.

"Mostly, I've been very worried about our young children," Goertemoeller said.

The "good news" is that the cases reported to the Cincinnati Children's center mostly have been minor and resolved at home, Goertemoeller said. She added that the amount of sodium azide in COVID-19 rapid tests is small.

Poison Control notes that the poisoning risk is low when these tests are used and disposed of properly.

Goertemoeller provided these safety tips:

Store the kits in a high cabinet, preferably locked, and out of sight of children.

For adults, read the directions carefully before using the test kits.

When done testing, immediately wrap the contents of the kit and dispose of them out of your home.

Check children's backpacks for kits, in case your child's school sent one home, and remove the kit immediately.

If you suspect someone has been exposed, call the poison center at 800-222-1222.

Contributing: Jordan Mendoza, USA TODAY

dukemunson Mar 01, 2022 11:44 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

We've gone mask less in virtually every field and situation...what possible basis is there to mask kids at school? Think your comment through...everyone is mask less...but keeping kids masked for the adult teachers makes sense?

Sun Mar 01, 2022 08:58 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

Link at bottom for each test kit content

Human toxicity from COVID-19 rapid home test kits
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8786400/

Kelly Johnson-Arbor, MD,a,b,⁎ Nicole Reid, BSN, EdM,b,c and Susan Smolinske, PharmDd,e
a MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, 3800 Reservoir Road NW, Washington, DC 20007, USA
b National Capital Poison Center, 3201 New Mexico Avenue NW, Suite 310, Washington, DC 20016, USA
c The George Washington University School of Medicine, 2300 Eye Street NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
d New Mexico Poison and Drug Information Center, MSC07 4390, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA
e College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, 2502 Marble Avenue, Albuquerque, NM 87106, USA

The persistence of the COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated the development and widespread availability of methods to detect the COVID-19 virus in humans. COVID-19 tests, which were initially only available in healthcare facility settings, are now manufactured for home use in the form of rapid diagnostic tests and generally contain a nasal swab, reagent solution, and test device (e.g., card or strip). These kits typically involve application of reagent solution to the test device; in the presence of biological material obtained from the nasal swab, this initiates a chemical reaction that produces the test result.

Multiple COVID-19 rapid antigen home test kids, including those manufactured by Abbott (BinaxNOW™), Beckton, Dickinson and Company (BD Veritor™), Celltrion (Celltrion DiaTrust™), and ACON Laboratories (Flowflex™), contain sodium azide as a component of the reagent solution. The reagent in some kits may contain other constituents, including Triton-X, inorganic phosphate, and Pro-Clin 300. The latter ingredients are unlikely to cause human toxicity if small amounts are ingested, but they may cause allergic reactions or local irritation after ocular or dermal exposure. However, sodium azide is well-known for its ability to cause harmful effects in humans, especially after oral exposures and potentially including the ingestion of reagent solution. Additionally, since the reagent solution packaging may include ampules that allow for application of drops of solution to the test device, inadvertent ocular sodium azide exposures can occur if the ampule is mistaken for an eyedropper.

Sodium azide is a water-soluble, tasteless, and odorless chemical that is commonly used as a preservative agent. It is also found as a propellant in some automobile airbags; upon impact, sodium azide ignites and transforms into hydrocarbon gases that cause airbag expansion. Although data concerning acute sodium azide toxicity in humans are limited, the chemical can cause serious adverse events after oral exposure to relatively low doses. In one study, sodium azide was administered at doses of 0.65 and 1.3 mg to healthy and hypertensive individuals (for a 70-kg adult, this corresponds to a dose of 0.01 and 0.02 mg/kg) [6]. Hypotension occurred rapidly, within 45–60 s in some subjects, and lasted for 10–15 min. Despite the fall in blood pressure, reflex tachycardia was not noted, but a detailed description of other adverse events was not provided by the authors. In the same study, one hypertensive subject who received oral doses of 0.3 mg (or 0.004 mg/kg for a 70-kg individual) experienced a change in blood pressure from 183/104 mmHg pre-treatment to 115/68 mmHg post-treatment. Ingestion of higher doses of sodium azide (>700 mg or 10 mg/kg) by adults is associated with cardiac arrhythmias, metabolic acidosis, and death [[7], [8], [9]].

The reagent fluid in many COVID-19 rapid antigen home test kits contains sodium azide in concentrations of 0.0125–0.0946%, and personal communication with test kit manufacturers revealed that the reagent fluid volume in these kits is small (0.3–0.625 mL). Thus, reagents with sodium azide concentrations less than 0.09–0.095% generally contain extremely low amounts of sodium azide (0.04–0.08 mg), or well below the amount expected to cause transient hypotension in adults. Kits that have reagent fluid with higher sodium azide concentrations (greater than or equal to 0.09%), including the BD Veritor™ and Celltrion DiaTrust™ testing systems, contain approximately 0.3 mg of sodium azide . Ingestions of this magnitude may result in hypotension, decreased end-organ perfusion, and syncope. Children may experience serious adverse events after exploratory oral exposures to minimal amounts of the reagent solutions due to their smaller body size and should be monitored closely for hypotension or other sequelae after ingestion of even minute quantities of reagent fluids. Since the onset of hypotension after oral exposure to sodium azide is rapid, prolonged observation is likely unnecessary for individuals who remain asymptomatic after reagent fluid ingestion. The treatment of symptomatic sodium azide intoxication is supportive in nature and includes intravenous fluids and vasoactive medications.

While home COVID-19 tests have remained in short supply throughout most of the current pandemic, the United States government began offering free tests to its residents starting in mid-January 2022. Prior to this distribution of free tests, numerous cases involving oral exposure to COVID-19 home test reagent fluid were reported to United States poison centers. From June 16, 2021 through January 19, 2022, the online webPOISONCONTROL® tool received 153 reports of human exposure to COVID-19 home test kits or reagents. Many of these cases were associated with no adverse effects, suggesting that exposures involving reagent fluid are unlikely to cause significant human toxicity. The expanded access to home tests will likely result in a further increase in human exposures to the reagent fluids. Emergency physicians, pharmacists, and poison center staff should maintain awareness of the potential toxicities associated with ingestion of the reagent fluids and should also be prepared to treat patients who present for care after exposures to the contents of COVID-19 rapid antigen home test kits.

1. Abbott BinaxNOW™ COVID-19 Ag card home test. 2022. https://www.fda.gov/media/144574/download Available at. Accessed 1.18.22.
2. BD BD Veritor™ At-Home COVID-19 test product information leaflet. 2022. https://bdveritor.bd.com/content/dam/bdveritorathome/documents/product-information-leaflet.pdf.coredownload.pdfAvailable at. Accessed 1.18.22.
3. ACON Laboratories Flowflex™ COVID-19 antigen home test package insert for healthcare providers. 2022. https://www.aconlabs.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/ACON-Labs-Flowflex-US-COVID-19-Home-Test-HCP-Insert-En.pdf Available at. Accessed 1.18.22.
4. Chang S., Lamm S.H. Human health effects of sodium azide exposure: a literature review and analysis. Int J Toxicol. 2003 May-Jun;22(3):175–186. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
5. Barnes S.S., Wong W., Jr., Affeldt J.C. A case of severe airbag related ocular alkali injury. Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2012 Aug;71(8):229–231. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
6. Black M.M., Zweifach B.W., Speer F.D. Comparison of hypotensive action of sodium azide in normotensive and hypertensive patients. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1954 Jan;85(1):11–16. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
7. Albertson T.E., Reed S., Siefkin A. A case of fatal sodium azide ingestion. J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1986;24(4):339–351.[PubMed] [Google Scholar]
8. Abrams J., El-Mallakh R.S., Meyer R. Suicidal sodium azide ingestion. Ann Emerg Med. 1987 Dec;16(12):1378–1380.[PubMed] [Google Scholar]
9. Judge K.W., Ward N.E. Fatal azide-induced cardiomyopathy presenting as acute myocardial infarction. Am J Cardiol. 1989 Oct 1;64(12):830–831. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
10. BD Veritor™ system for rapid detection of SARS CoV-2. 2022. https://bdveritor.bd.com/content/dam/bdveritor/pdfs/BD-Veritor-IFU.pdf Available at. Accessed 1.19.22.
11. Celltrion Celltrion DiaTrust™ COVID-19 Ag home test healthcare provider instructions for use. 2022. https://www.fda.gov/media/153420/download Available at. Accessed 1.19.22.

Sun Mar 01, 2022 09:46 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

@2LCP112233 and CHICO you're welcome ... all credit goes to the authors .... As the authors stated ....Emergency physicians, pharmacists, and poison center staff should maintain awareness of the potential toxicities associated with ingestion of the reagent fluids and should also be prepared to treat patients who present for care after exposures to the contents of COVID-19 rapid antigen home test kits.

Sun Mar 03, 2022 09:40 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

True you can't protect everyone but you can inform them. Children get ahold of stuff and put it in their mouths all the time, people could confuse the bottle for eye drops, testers could get the solution on their hands rub their eyes or eat food, people could be sensitive to the solution and have an allergic reaction either by contact or inhalation...luckily Alex you have been informed so chances are you won't have a problem unless as you state you are a moron.

edney Mar 01, 2022 10:12 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

From CDC
Numbers are as of 2/23/2022
https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/Provisional-COVID-19-Deaths-Focus-on-Ages-0-18-Yea/nr4s-juj3

CDC does its ages differently, 0-4 and 5-18 The data is for 2 years 1 month
Deaths from COVID Age 0-4 Nationwide = 307
Deaths from COVID Age 5-18 Nationwide = 663

Total deaths 970 divided by 25 Months yields about a rough average of 39 deaths in age group 0-18 per month, Nationwide over the course of the pandemic to date.

0-18 is about 22% of the US population and has 970 deaths
The other 78% of the population has 943,900 deaths

https://www.kff.org/other/state-indicator/cumulative-covid-19-cases-and-deaths/?currentTimeframe=0&sortModel=%7B%22colId%22:%22Location%22,%22sort%22:%22asc%22%7D

Deaths may well "surge" in CA, but that will be because our students have been sheltered. States that went back to school, no masks a year ago shouldn't see a spike.

a-1646177550 Mar 01, 2022 03:32 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

10:12 AM - Deaths are one thing. The threat of ongoing health problems for years from long COVID is quite another. That and the health of the adults in the room and the immunocompromised community exposed to the infected. Masks are not a problem. Ignorance is.

Voice of Reason Mar 01, 2022 03:44 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

@3:32 you are free to wear your mask and stay safe at home for as long as you like. Everyone else recognizes there are many things that were around well before covid that pose a threat of ongoing health problems and are comfortable living normal lives knowing that nothing is without risk. Long-term, we'd save a lot more lives if we pushed for healthy eating, regular exercise, and sunshine as strongly as we pushed for masks.

edney Mar 01, 2022 06:03 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

OK
Here are the totals so far:

https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/Age-Race-Ethnicity.aspx

1.6M children in CA are known to have had COVID during the mask mandate. over the last two years
1,599,000 recovered

Study UC Davis data through Feb. 10 2022
https://health.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/covid-19-information/covid-19-long-haulers
"Studies indicate that about 10% of people infected with COVID-19 will experience long-haul symptoms."

"For some people, COVID-19 symptoms can last anywhere from four weeks to six months after testing positive for the virus."

Sounds alarming. But over a two year period, that means 160,000 0-18 might have had "long haul" symptoms.
Since the range is 4 weeks - 6 months less than 10% of those should still be experiencing symptoms and they should all be fine by June.

I believe in the two years of science

mm1970 Mar 02, 2022 10:04 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

My kids don't mind the masks, and they've been very flexible through all of this. But:
- for the last month, masks have only been required indoors. My elementary kid spends at least half his days outdoors when you count after school care. HS kid wears it longer bus doesn't care.
- both of my kids are vaccinated, and the teen is boosted -AND-
- Our local numbers are down, esp when you consider hospitalizations.

Masks are fine but yeah, when is the end date? Is it zero? I don't think it should be zero. I think during the Delta and Omicron waves, before 5-11 yo were eligible for vaccination, YES to the masks. But now?

a-1646244796 Mar 02, 2022 10:13 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

They don't mind masks because they don't have a choice. Give them the choice, then you'll see. This contrasts with seatbelt laws, an often used example of a law "for our safety", if all of a sudden they took away seatbelt laws, most people would still buckle up.

Voice of Reason Mar 02, 2022 10:49 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

With the age and comorbidities of most in attendance at the SOTU, even when fully vaxxed and booster, they are all at more risk from covid than a unvaccinated healthy 10 year old. Yet they've been meeting, attending fund raisers, going to large events, etc. for months without masks, while children in school are still in masks.

a-1646277881 Mar 02, 2022 07:24 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

I was talking to a friend today who had an acquaintance who had just survived a bad case of Covid but who’s spouse did not. They caught it at a party. A person at the party caught if from their kid who caught it at school. Sure, the kids are fine, but not everyone else is.

mm1970 Mar 03, 2022 11:01 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

@DUKE, like I said - during a big wave like Omicron or Delta, sure. YES to the MASKS. In fact, during Omicron we upgraded our kids to the M95i's/ M95c's. Kids are so used to them that they don't even take them off in the car after getting picked up, even when we remind them. (But the elementary kid is looking forward to March 14, nonetheless.)

But now? Our numbers are down, everyone is vaxxed.

To @724, that is really sad - but what's the answer? Send kids to masks at school? Or avoid parties? Was the person at the party sick? Had their kid been sick? If you are going to a party indoors, who wears masks? Is it my 9 yo's responsibility to wear at mask at school so that I don't get COVID and go to a party and give it to someone at the party?

Or is it MY responsibility to wear a mask at a party if there are people there who are at risk? Or is it the person who is at risk's responsibility? Or both? (I don't wear masks outdoors, and I don't wear it at work, but I do still wear them in grocery stores and crowded public places.)

Voice of Reason Mar 03, 2022 11:09 AM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

Our responsibilities are as they were prior to covid (or should have been): wash your hands often, properly cover sneezes/coughs, try not to touch your face, and stay home when sick. As a germaphobe from before covid, it amazed me when this started how many people weren't already doing these things.

Voice of Reason Mar 03, 2022 01:44 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

Duke, I guess we're back to funding/defunding meaning what is used to. Remember all those calls to defund the police by politicians only to alienate those who protect and serve while dangerous crime spiked resulting in defunding police polling horribly and us being then told "defund doesn't really mean take money away..." and now at the SOTU we're back to funding the police. What a roller coaster, good times...

Voice of Reason Mar 03, 2022 01:47 PM
Masks Mandate for Santa Barbara County Students Ends after March 11

Just a little refresher, here's a montage of some of our favorite politicians demanding the defunding of police, taking away actually money from police departments, and applauding mayors who followed through with it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9OZMBuVL5U

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