Learn How the Desal Plant Produces Water

Learn How the Desal Plant Produces Water title=
Learn How the Desal Plant Produces Water
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Source: The City of Santa Barbara

The City's Desalination Plant uses state-of-the-art technology and design practices to reduce electrical demand and environmental impacts, while providing a critical water supply for the City. The plant produces three million gallons of drinking water per day. This is equivalent to 3,125 acre-feet of water annually, or about 30 percent of the City's demand.

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pkww Mar 27, 2018 03:27 PM
Learn How the Desal Plant Produces Water

The city is doing an okay job using recycled water here in town for irrigation and other non-potable uses. I would be all for bringing the "purple pipe" into public and private buildings to flush toilets. Maybe they are doing that already. We should all support such endeavors and encourage the city to get creative. Here's a map of the distribution: https://www.santabarbaraca.gov/civicax/filebank/blobdload.aspx?BlobID=19755 That said, I liked the video and think that the desal plant is great to have in a pinch.

a-1556265463 Mar 27, 2018 01:40 PM
Learn How the Desal Plant Produces Water

Here's my proposal. Since Goleta has to put up with the traffic and noise from the "SB" airport, and since SB wants to put even more traffic & noise in Goleta with new buildings on extended airport property, SB shares its desal water with Goleta 50/50 in exchange for mitigation fees for the traffic and noise they're imposing on Goleta. And Montecito ought to figure out how to cooperate regionally as well, rather than build their own desal plant. Perhaps Montecito could be the lead entity on building Yeti's proposed reclamation plant.

Yeti Mar 27, 2018 01:32 PM
Learn How the Desal Plant Produces Water

It really is a shame that the city has built a Desal plant. What a colossal waste of money, energy to run it and the huge carbon footprint as a result. It is not a good solution on so many different levels. With about 70% of our daily water needs going out to the ocean from the water treatment plant, a water reclamation program makes so much more sense. Capture the outgoing treated water, treat it one more time and then let it perk into the local aquifers, cleansed again for the natural ground bacteria, then pumped out many days later for municipal use. It just makes so much more sense AND it costs a small fraction of the Desal plant initially and on an on-going basis.

Mas Gaviota Mar 28, 2018 01:41 PM
Learn How the Desal Plant Produces Water

Uh.... the voters voted for the desal plant in 1991. It was put to sleep a shortime after its completion. In 2015 the City Council aka the City voted to allocate $55 million to reactivate this white elephant. The $55 million was an estimate, we are actually spending about $70 million for this boondoggle. Factotum? not really

Channelfog Mar 28, 2018 04:53 AM
Learn How the Desal Plant Produces Water

We were stuck with an outdated sewage treatment plant the day it was built. This design/build is a function of nepotism (3rd world problem) and was wrong from the start. There were other designs, but they were only courted after construction proved a flawed design. They were told that there is no fix and that the plant should have been built with a better design from the beginning. The definition of a 3rd world country is one that exports raw materials and imports finished goods; a definition that has applied to the U.S. for many decades. No 1st world high horse here!

Mas Gaviota Mar 27, 2018 03:28 PM
Learn How the Desal Plant Produces Water

Actually it has been worked out in that hotbed of green thinking....Orange County California! https://www.ocwd.com/what-we-do/ The Santa Barbara City Council went for the sexy desalination plant instead of spending less money on the much more environmentally friendly water treatment plant. We are still stuck with a outdated sewage treatment facitity that creates a horrible odor cloud that from time to time stinks up the prime tourist areas of town. That would be acceptable in a second or third world country, but not in the American Riviera.

oceandrew Mar 27, 2018 01:46 PM
Learn How the Desal Plant Produces Water

I'm curious where these "percolation fields" are that recharge the local aquifers and how you'd get the reclaimed water there? How much reclaimed water can they handle on a daily basis or does the extra production of reclaimed water need to be trucked to other fields around the county? I love the idea of recycling reclaimed water but it doesn't appear that the how of it has been worked out yet.

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