CBS Sunday Morning Features Historic Montecito Estate

CBS Sunday Morning Features Historic Montecito Estate title=
El Fureidis (Photo by Eric Foote)
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Source: Village Properties

A historic Montecito mansion whose former guests include Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill and John F. Kennedy, was the featured backdrop to CBS Sunday Morning’s annual “By Design” edition Sunday.

The grand El Fureidis estate, famous for its appearance in the 1983 movie “Scarface,” is one of the most exceptional properties in an area renowned for its opulent homes and celebrity residents. Designed by celebrated architect Bertram Goodhue, the almost 12,000-square-foot home resembles a classic Roman villa and is set among 10 acres of Persian-style water gardens, lush landscaping, and terraces with stunning views of the Pacific Ocean.

Award-winning television host Jane Pauley anchored Sunday’s program from the estate. El Fureidis is currently on the market for $39,995 million. The listing is held by Riskin Partners Estates Group, the luxury division of Montecito-based Village Properties.

"We are thrilled to have El Furiedis host Jane Pauley and this weekend's CBS Sunday Morning,” said Riskin Partner’s Jasmine Tennis. “El Fureidis has such a rich and interesting history, and we love that CBS is featuring this incredible property - and our amazing community - with their viewership." 

In “Scarface,” the outside of El Furiedis was used for the home of Al Pacino’s character, Tony Montana. In real life, the property’s former owners include the famous German author, Thomas Mann. 

The acclaimed property’s latest TV appearance builds on a long tradition at CBS Sunday Morning of broadcasting from a prominent location each May for a show focused on design and travel. Previous editions have featured Hearst Castle, the Biltmore Estate in North Carolina, and The Breakers in Rhode Island. Other episodes have taken viewers to Florence, London and Amsterdam.

In addition to exploring the history of El Furiedis, which literally translates to “tropical paradise,” Sunday’s show delved into the rich history of the Santa Barbara area, including its Spanish-inspired design and former reputation as the “Hollywood of the North.”

- For information about El Furiedis visit https://montecito-realestate.com/631-parra-grande-lane or contact Riskin Partners Estate Group at team@riskinpartners.com and (805) 565-8600

- For information about Village Properties visit https://villagesite.com/ or email info@villagesite.com

- Village Properties is an elite member of Forbes Global Properties, a curated consumer marketplace that showcases high value homes available for sale around the world. For more information about Forbes Global Properties visit forbesglobalproperties.com

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bjgreen May 24, 2022 06:18 PM
CBS Sunday Morning Features Historic Montecito Estate

Nearly 20 silent movies were filmed at El Fureidis between 1911 and 1920. It was the most popular location for filming silents in Montecito. (I'll have more specific info in my forthcoming book, "Movies & Million-Dollar Mansions: Silent Movies Made in Montecito, CA.")

a-1653451334 May 24, 2022 09:02 PM
CBS Sunday Morning Features Historic Montecito Estate

I do like to read about ridiculously gigantic, expensive homes, even as they anger me.

2 questions:
"... El Furiedis, which literally translates to “tropical paradise,”"
In what language?

"... the property’s former owners include the famous German author, Thomas Mann."
Really? I thought he only lived in LA County.

In Pacific Palisades: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/will-thomas-manns-house-be-demolished

https://la.curbed.com/2016/8/16/12504406/thomas-mann-pacific-palisades-home-teardown

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2022/01/24/thomas-manns-brush-with-darkness

Wikipedia:
"In 1939, following the German occupation of Czechoslovakia, he emigrated to the United States. He moved to Princeton, New Jersey, where he lived on 65 Stockton Street and began to teach at Princeton University.[4] In 1942, the Mann family moved to 1550 San Remo Drive in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. The Manns were prominent members of the German expatriate community of Los Angeles, and would frequently meet other emigres at the house of Salka and Bertold Viertel in Santa Monica, and at the Villa Aurora, the home of fellow German exile Lion Feuchtwanger.[5][6] On 23 June 1944 Thomas Mann was naturalized as a citizen of the United States. The Manns lived in Los Angeles until 1952.

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