EPA Recognizes Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians for Recycling Accomplishments

EPA Recognizes Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians for Recycling Accomplishments title=
EPA Recognizes Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians for Recycling Accomplishments
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Photo: Chumash Casino

Source: U.S. EPA

[On Tuesday], the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians and Chumash Casino Resort for its outstanding efforts in recycling, food recovery and moving toward Zero Waste. EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest Mike Stoker toured the Chumash Casino Resort to celebrate their green leadership during America Recycles Week.

“The Chumash Casino Resort’s Zero Waste initiatives are making a real difference for the environment,” said EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Mike Stoker. “By diverting more than 90% of their total waste stream from landfills and sharing their expertise with other tribes, they are true recycling champions.”

“It’s an honor for our tribe to be recognized by the EPA during America Recycles Week,” said Kenneth Kahn, Tribal Chairman for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians. “By forming local partnerships and participating in innovative programs, our Chumash Casino Resort’s Facilities Department has taken our recycling efforts to new heights. We are proud of our team’s ongoing campaign to further reduce our waste stream and its ability to be an industry leader for recycling in California Indian Gaming.”

In 2018, the Chumash Casino Resort diverted 2,922,307 pounds of waste, representing over 90% of its overall waste stream, from local landfills through their successful Zero Waste program. To reach this ambitious target, the Chumash Casino Resort has formed both local and national partnerships and participated in several innovative programs to complement its extensive in-house recycling efforts.

The Chumash Casino Resort has won several EPA awards, including the Food Recovery Challenge award in 2014 and 2016. The EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge partners with over 1,000 organizations and businesses to prevent and reduce wasted food. The program saves money, helps communities reduce hunger, and protects the environment by purchasing less, donating extra food and composting. In 2018, the Chumash Casino Resort donated more than four tons – 8,478 pounds – of food to Veggie Rescue to improve the nutrition and quality of life for community members struggling with food insecurity by providing healthy meals.

The Chumash Casino Resort has also been an EPA WasteWise partner since 2008 and has received national WasteWise Partner of the Year awards in 2012 and 2015. The WasteWise program helps organizations and businesses apply sustainable materials management practices to reduce municipal and industrial wastes.

The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians owns and operates the Chumash Casino Resort, which is located on the tribe’s reservation on Highway 246 in Santa Ynez, California.

For more information on joining America Recycles efforts, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/americarecycles

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a-1575627354 Nov 18, 2019 05:26 PM
EPA Recognizes Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians for Recycling Accomplishments

There's a company in Australia that's trying to get funding for their genius idea: melting down plastic back to oil and reusing it that way, to make more plastic items. I didn't see what the effect would be on air quality, but I do like the idea of finding a way to recycle all plastic drink and food containers.--------------https://www.wimp.com/have-australian-scientists-discovered-a-recycling-solution-to-our-plastics-problem/

Flicka Nov 18, 2019 03:22 PM
EPA Recognizes Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians for Recycling Accomplishments

You are right, 9:42am, as far as I'm concerned they can do anything they want. Look what has been done to the valley once theirs. We gave them about the worst property in the valley for a reservation. About 40-50 years ago the government built them houses there; they were so shoddy they couldn't pass for a permit so no one could live in them. Gosh, horrible they can now live like the white man!

a-1575627354 Nov 18, 2019 04:19 PM
EPA Recognizes Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians for Recycling Accomplishments

Flicka, your comment suggests that it is better to be "white"...your words, not mine. Racists never think they are racist. The Chumash are a proud people who completely resent being characterized as as being less than white by "living like a white man." I am sure they do not appreciate such terrible comments.

RHS Nov 18, 2019 08:19 AM
EPA Recognizes Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians for Recycling Accomplishments

Presenting this story as a "news" item is pretty far-fetched. This is just a publicity piece for Stoker and the Chumash and each is washing the other's hands. The Casino is never going to be environmentally acceptable. The vehicle traffic and congestion it generates is destructive and, unless on-line gambling takes its place, unavoidable. Trying to make it look like the current EPA cares about real environmental benefit is also silly.

Luvaduck Nov 18, 2019 07:23 AM
EPA Recognizes Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians for Recycling Accomplishments

Since many plastic varieties we could formerly sell abroad for reuse are no longer saleable, what we can recycle has been vastly downscaled. I would be interested to see what this group of people come up with as an eco-wise alternative if it could be applied in our own recycling stream. It would be interesting to know what Marborough is researching in the same vein here and what other companies are doing elsewhere before dumps see at least a two-fold increase.

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