Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest title=
Photo: Bryant Baker / LPFW
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Source: Los Padres ForestWatch

Last week the Forest Service announced a plan to log large trees and clear native chaparral habitat across 235,000 acres (368 square miles) within four of the five ranger districts of Los Padres National Forest. The announcement comes just a few months after conservation organizations, Patagonia, and two municipal governments filed lawsuits against the Forest Service over their approval of logging on Pine Mountain in Ventura County. The new project is 311 times larger and would fundamentally alter the landscape while taking limited funding away from more effective wildfire mitigation efforts such as home hardening and retrofits, community alert systems, and defensible space.

The announcement—signed by Forest Supervisor Chris Stubbs—included a letter and a short description of the new proposal, dubbed the “Ecological Restoration Project,” that was crafted behind closed doors in recent months. The project is likely the largest to ever be proposed for the Los Padres National Forest as it includes 48,000 acres of logging and other vegetation removal across several areas designated as “forest health treatment units” in addition to 186,000 acres of tree and shrub removal along roads, trails, and in many remote parts of the national forest. If approved, the project would allow the same activities the agency is planning on Pine Mountain—activities that were opposed by over 16,000 people, including tribal groups, elected officials, organizations, and businesses across the region—at an enormous scale.

The project would allow the use of heavy equipment to log live and dead trees up to two feet in diameter across many forested areas, and larger trees with no diameter limit could be removed across the 186,000 acres of vaguely described “fuel break and defense zones.” If the project moves forward and receives approval from the agency, damaging timber harvest and chaparral removal activities could take place from Mt. Pinos to Figueroa Mountain to Big Sur without any further site-specific environmental analysis or public notice.

“What the Forest Service is proposing here is truly massive and dangerous,” said ForestWatch director of conservation and research Bryant Baker. “It would facilitate the construction of dozens of ecologically damaging remote fuel breaks that have been shown time and again to fail under the extreme weather conditions that fuel the largest fires in our region.”

Many areas targeted for clearing are currently being reviewed by Congress for protection as wilderness under the Central Coast Heritage Protection Act, which just passed the U.S. House of Representatives last month and is awaiting a vote in the Senate as part of a larger legislative package. According to analysis of official mapping data obtained from the agency, about 35,000 acres of the new project overlaps with the new land designations.

Forest officials have indicated that they plan to prepare an environmental assessment for the nearly forest-wide project. While this involves more analysis than the loopholes the agency has been using to approve recent logging projects, it still only requires a single public comment period—ongoing until August 28 unless an extension is granted—and is less robust than an environmental impact statement, which is typically prepared for projects of this size and scope. The agency’s funding for the environmental review process comes from a $1.681 million grant from PG&E, a utility that has been responsible for some of the state’s largest and deadliest wildfires including the 2018 Camp Fire that killed 85 people and destroyed nearly 19,000 structures. Because the company’s service area does not cover southern Ventura County, the entire Ojai Ranger District stretching from Pine Mountain Ridge to Ojai has been excluded from the project.

“PG&E is pouring millions into ecologically destructive projects while failing to address their own infrastructure's deferred maintenance and ignition risk in the area,” said Baker, whose organization has filed requests under the Freedom of Information Act to learn more details about the funding.

For nearly 80% of the project area, there is no diameter limit for tree removal. The proposal states that only “some” trees would be retained in these areas. According to the agency, fuel breaks would be up to 1,500 feet wide depending on the vegetation type, but preliminary analysis of mapping data has revealed that several fuel breaks would be 2,000 to 5,000 feet wide. Researchers have found that fuel breaks are ineffective at limiting the spread of large wildfires, especially under extreme weather conditions such as Santa Ana or sundowner winds. These conditions have been a driving force of some of the region’s largest blazes, such as the 2017 Thomas Fire.

Scientists and conservation organizations have long advocated that instead of going to backcountry logging and vegetation removal projects, funding should be directed to creating defensible space directly next to homes, retrofitting and building structures with fire-safe materials, and reducing development in the wildland-urban interface. Areas where native trees and shrubs are removed with heavy equipment are also prone to being infested with non-native invasive plants that can increase wildfire risk.

The agency is currently accepting public comments on the proposal until August 28. Visit lpfw.org/ERP to easily submit a comment online. An interactive map showing the areas slated for logging and vegetation clearing can be found at lpfw.org/ERP-map.

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KarmaSB Aug 04, 2022 12:08 PM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

this is flat out wrong and is nothing short of destroying the forest and it's natural form. this is going to destroy natural habitats/homes for hundreds of species. Killing brush and healthy trees, bringing in heavy equipment to sensitive areas, displacing hundreds if not thousands of individual creatures that call this place home. I'd love to see which logging companies won this and how they won it. Seems highly suspicious and i hope to god that they stop this before it starts. i spend a lot of time in the Sespe, Pine Mountain, Reyes Peak, and have grown up backpacking the Los Padres Forest. This is totally illogical and destructive. Before you start defending this, I'd like to first ask, how much time have you spent there? Probably none.

Chip of SB Aug 04, 2022 12:21 PM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

If these “environmentalist” organizations are able to delay this plan for long enough that a massive wildfire burns this beautiful forest land down to a moonscape, they will have ashes to n their hands. The condition of the forest today is far from natural, it is instead the product to f a century of human intervention in the form of fire suppression. Removing fire from an ecosystem that adapted to fire over millennia has created a dangerous imbalance. Disease is more prevalent, and merge trees are vulnerable to destruction because ladder dues have been built up by the elimination of frequent lo intensity fires. Selectively logging, clearing, and thinning the forest will help restore a more natural balance. Once this project is completed, the forest will be resilient and ready to resume the natural cycle of frequent lo intensity fires with minimal risk of destroying large
Mature trees. However, if the “environmentalist” organizations are successful in delaying or blocking this project and perpetuating the way unnatural practice of fire suppression the complete destruction of this forest will be assured. I can’t wrap my head around why so-called environmentalists are opposed to restoring the forest to its natural condition and instead seem to be unknowingly hell bent on assuring its complete destruction.

GeneralTree Aug 05, 2022 01:44 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Chip is going to break out the Donald Trump model 45 forest-floor vacuum. All the drivers of this MAGA inspired forest decapitator take mega-doses of hydroxychloroquine to 100% protect themselves from COVID as not to stop this important job. Standard uniform for the job is a white sheet with hood but no mask for debris inhalation - because Americuh.

Chip of SB Aug 04, 2022 12:31 PM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Many seem to take exception of logging and mechanical clearing. However, this is a low risk and highly controlled way to restore the forest to a more natural condition. Another approach is controlled burns, and combining co trolled burns with mechanical thinning and clearing is highly effective.. Here is an article explaining how and why not a single giant sequoia died in the recent fire in and around mariposa grove. In particular:

“And most important, he noted, Yosemite crews have conducted 21 controlled burns in and around the Mariposa Grove since 1971. Those recreated natural conditions that occurred centuries ago when lightning strikes and burning by native tribes made fire a common part of the environment in the Sierra. The controlled burns and some moderate thinning of smaller fir trees removed dead wood and brush from the forest floor that otherwise could have caused the Washburn Fire to burn much hotter and more lethally to the big trees.”

https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2022/08/03/yosemites-mariposa-grove-reopens-as-washburn-fire-winds-down/

Babycakes Aug 04, 2022 02:17 PM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Brush and leaf clearing around your property must be done if you live in/around our foothills, and even within the city if you have a lot of vegetation ("fuel"). The forestry and fire department see this vegetation as fuel and something to get rid of as soon as possible. Oaks and Eucalyptus are the main culprits to be concerned about as both drop huge amounts of leaves and dried broken branches. The leaves and branches are nothing but fuel for any fire to come through, so be sure to clear these things away from your homes. This same principal is applicable even on a much larger scale as being proposed. Thomas fire would have not been as bad as it was had vegetation/fuel been cleaned up, but people kicked/screamed for some reason citing something about ruining the environment. Well, the environment burned up and will burn up if we don't take action.

Chip of SB Aug 04, 2022 03:50 PM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Please see the article I linked to about how the ancient sequoias in mariposa grove were saved by clearing brush, cutting down trees (aka logging) and conducting controlled burns. Had it not been for these efforts to restore the mariposa grove to its natural condition, the recent wildfire would have likely wiped out most of the 2000 year old giant sequoias in the grove. The same reasoning applies to this proposed project. If we do nothing, the forest will burn down to a moonscape. If we selective thin, log, and create clear spaces there will still be a healthy and thriving forest left after the next wildfire. I know it’s counterintuitive, but if we don’t clear and thin some of the forest now, a wildfire will clear all of the forest later.

sacjon Aug 05, 2022 11:39 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Did they really though? How so? You mean by fighting fires that get close to homes/buildings? Wouldn't leaving the forests and trees alone allow them to "clear" themselves? You're against "fire suppression," but for "clearing out" deadwood, trees, etc.

Which is it? Leave the forests alone and let them do their thing, or continue to meddle with them, while saying human intervention is bad?

Chip of SB Aug 05, 2022 02:25 PM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Sac, I understand your question and I think you bring up a good point. If the goal is to have our forests in a natural equilibrium, then why do humans need to meddle with them? I see two main reasons why intervention is required. First, the last century of fire suppression has driven the forest far from its natural equilibrium and caused unnaturally high density and an unnatural accumulation of dead vegetation. In this condition, fire would be unduly destructive to the forest. Intervening to thin and clear the forest is necessary in order to reintroduce fire in a less destructive way that is more consistent with the historic cycle of frequent low intensity fires. Stopping fire suppression cold turkey and allowing it all to burn would be extremely destructive. Second, human infrastructure blocks the natural propagation of fire. Roads, housing tracts, and agricultural operations all create unnatural fire breaks. In the absence of humans, lightning would spark fires all over the western us every year and these fires would burn and smolder unchecked for months until the rains stopped them. That is no longer possible with human civilization in the way. The solution is some limited intervention to try to replicate the natural propagation of fire as closely as possible. This would come in the form of extensive prescribed burns. The indigenous peoples of North America figures this out thousands of years ago, and the forest and humans alike benefitted from frequent low intensity fires until the white man came and implemented the fire suppression regime.

Chip of SB Aug 05, 2022 03:39 PM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Sac, below is a link to the type of fire suppression I am talking about. The concept of universal fire suppression dates to the late 19th century, and was technically put into force in the very early 20th century. However, it was still challenging to reach fires in extremely remote areas. The use of aircraft took firefighting to another level, and this trend was greatly accelerated with the abundance of surplus aircraft available after WWII.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCRDbODedg4

chico berkeley Aug 04, 2022 04:44 PM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

The history shows that the local Indians set fires on purpose to make sure that they would not be caught in a large one.
They considered it renewing the land.
Some famous historical art, pics and photos show fire in the background on the mountains.
My mother went to the predecessor of UCSB to become a teacher, and a part of the curriculum was local history and fire was a part of it.

Chip of SB Aug 04, 2022 05:11 PM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Here is a great lecture explaining how human intervention in the form of mechanized fire suppression has transformed our forests and dramatically increased the size and severity of forest fires. It’s less than 15 minutes and provides compelling evidence.

https://www.ted.com/talks/paul_hessburg_why_wildfires_have_gotten_worse_and_what_we_can_do_about_it

SBTejano Aug 05, 2022 06:10 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Out with the old, in with the new. Long overdue! Yet, the “Chicken little, the sky is falling,” wack jobs try to turn our forests into a burned out compost heap. Threatening homes and lives, enough of this policy which holds us hostage.
Even the natives had controlled burns!
I know, I know the problem is based on global warming and Orange Man. Maybe if it was their family or property which was destroyed these truly misguided folks would see it differently.
Ya, right? Take your indignant, self righteous evangelical fervor over to Paradise, Ca and float that balloon! Once again, the Environmental Industrial Complex is trying to burden our society with their dogma. Yep, same ole’ folks, parade of clowns, Sierra Club, Green Peace, Audubon Society, Environmental Defense Fund and so on. In fact, fire erupted just now in western Goleta, time to hand a shovel and hose to these phonies and put them to work! But no, they’ll try to tie this up in court for years with their frivolous law suits which costs taxpayers millions and could be used for saving lives and property!

Sun Aug 05, 2022 07:58 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

When you get rid of trees you get rid of shade. When you get rid of share you increase heat. When you increase heat you get water evaporation. When you get high heat and high water evaporation you create the perfect climate for Forrest fires.

Logging 368 square miles will create the perfect storm for forest fires. Instead keep the shade, the trees and moisture in the ground, create health ecosystems that manage climate change. PG&E, bury your lines, that will prevent electrical fires! It's not rocket science.

beanbaby Aug 05, 2022 08:01 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

The USFS was created about 1910 . It was designed as a road building ,mining and timber operation. In California USFS used federal fraudulent land surveys by Benson and Binge syndicates to steal homesteads in Monterey National Forest using un named surveyors. Then changed name to Santa Barbara National Forest. Another name change ,to Los Padres National Forest. Creating Wilderness that continues to change shape and size to this day.
Moving forward we must use 7000 year old knowledge of the original people from Monterey to Ojai to heal what the USFS has destroyed in last 120 years.

Sun Aug 05, 2022 08:02 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Oops corrected auto correct spelling...
When you get rid of trees you get rid of shade. When you get rid of shade you increase heat. When you increase heat you get water evaporation. When you get high heat and high water evaporation you create the perfect climate for Forrest fires.

Logging 368 square miles will create the perfect storm for forest fires. Instead keep the shade, and keep the trees and moisture in the ground, create healthy ecosystems that manage climate change.
PG&E, bury your lines, that will prevent electrical fires! It's not rocket science.

Chip of SB Aug 05, 2022 08:32 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Sun, when you impose decades of mechanized fire suppression on a forest that was adapted to burn frequently, you set the stage for a megafire. Next time this forest burns, and it will burn even if pg&e buried all its power lines, the heat will be so intense that every single tree will be destroyed. It will take generations before new trees grow back and provide shade again. If this proposed project is completed, the next fire will burn with lower intensity, the tall trees will survive, and shade will remain.

Sun Aug 05, 2022 08:39 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

@chip
Importance of Fungi in Forest Ecosystems and Forrest Management!

April, 2002

Fungi perform a number of essential functions in forest ecosystems and are an important forest resource. The following list is certainly not exhaustive, but includes functions for consideration when making forest management decisions.

Mycorrhizal associates - Mycorrhizal fungi form mutualistic symbioses with host plant roots, increasing plant water and nutrient uptake in exchange for carbon (for reviews see Allen 1991, O’Dell et al. 1993, and Smith and Read, 1997).
Pathogens - By killing trees, pathogenic fungi can reduce or eliminate plant species, cause gaps in the forest canopy that may increase plant species diversity (Holah et al. 1993), and add to accumulation of dead wood. As a consequence of altering plant diversity, pathogenic fungi in turn alter the fungal community (Christensen 1989). Other pathogenic fungi such as heart rot fungi, while not true tree killers, have an influence on nutrient cycling and wildlife habitat (Hennon 1995).
Decomposers – Wood and litter decay fungi recycle carbon, minerals, and nutrients for use by other organisms, and contribute to the soil matrix physical properties. Fungal fruiting bodies are a major agent of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium export from logs, particularly in the early stages of decomposition (Harmon et al. 1994).
Wildlife food sources - Fungi provide an important food source for many species, including microbes, arthropods, nematodes, and mammals (Fogel and Trappe 1978, Maser et al. 1978, Ingham and Molina 1991).
Edibles and medicinals - The harvest of edible and medicinal fungi, including chanterelles, morels, matsutake, boletes, truffles, ganoderma (reishi) and others is a growing industry, particularly in the Pacific Northwest (Molina et al. 1993, Schlosser and Blatner 1995, Amaranthus and Pilz 1996, Pilz et al. 1998). In addition, recreational mushroom collecting has become increasingly popular in the past several decades.

Preservation of fungal species diversity and viability is essential to ecosystem functioning. As heterotrophic organisms, many fungi are directly or indirectly dependent on plant communities. As plant communities change under the influence of soil, climate, topography, and organisms, or as a result of natural catastrophes or forest management, fungal species composition is altered (for review see Molina et al. 2001). Fungal species composition in turn influences plant community structure, providing a complex feedback mechanism (van der Heijden et al. 1998). In North America a number of researchers have studied the effects of forest management practices on fungal communities (Pilz and Perry 1984, O’Dell et al. 1992, Clarkson and Mills 1994, Cázares et al. 1998, Stendell et al. 1999, Colgan et al. 1999). In general, activities such as clear cutting and thinning result in a change in the fungal community, as well as a decrease in fungal sporocarp (mushroom) production or levels of ectomycorrhizae formation. European researchers attribute habitat destruction and forest management practices to declines of fungal diversity, especially for rare species (Rydin et al. 1997). In particular, the decline in numbers of old trees and amount of coarse woody debris in Swedish forests is considered a threat to many fungal species (Berg et al. 1994).

Presently no guidelines are in place for dead wood management to provide for the maintenance of fungal biodiversity. The following summary provides information regarding the relationship of dead wood to forest fungi, and direction for management within the context of the DecAID model.

IMPORTANCE OF DEAD WOOD TO FUNGI

Down wood can be grouped in decay classes, the most commonly used being the 5-class system (Spies and Cline 1988, Maser et al. 1979). In this system, the five decay classes range continuously from I (recently down wood with intact bark and twigs) to V (soft and powdery texture). Although little is known about fungus-habitat relations, it is apparent that many fungi are associated with down wood. Following is a brief review of current knowledge.

In both old-growth and young stands of Douglas-fir in the West Cascades of Oregon, Smith et al. (2000) observed an increase in the occurrence of the ectomycorrhizal fungus, Piloderma fallax, with an increase in percent cover of down wood in decay class V. Amaranthus et al. (1994) found that down wood presence increased the probability of truffle and false truffle occurrence, particularly within one meter of down wood. Down wood acts as a moisture-retaining substrate, allowing root tips to support active ectomycorrhizae (Harvey et al. 1976, Harvey et al. 1978, Amaranthus et al. 1989, Harmon and Sexton 1995). These fallen tree “reservoirs” may provide refugia for seedlings and mycorrhizal fungi, particularly in more arid forests and at times of seasonal dryness. As stands mature, the availability of down wood may be crucial for establishment of fungi as well as plant seedlings (Kropp 1982).

In the case of decay fungi and pathogens, down wood is a direct food source. Studies in both Scandinavia and North America indicate the presence of large down wood promotes high species diversity of wood-decay fungi (Kruys, et al. 1999, Crites and Dale 1998, Ohlson et al. 1997, Høiland and Bendiksen 1996, Bader et al. 1995, Wästerlund and Ingelög 1981). Høiland and Bendiksen (1996) found that rare wood-inhabiting fungal species occurred primarily on long (average length = 11 meters) and well-decayed (average decay Class III) down wood. When surface area is taken into consideration, fine woody debris appears to be equally important to species diversity (Kruys and Jonsson 1999).
CONSIDERATIONS FOR FOREST MANAGEMENT

If maintenance of fungal biodiversity is a goal, then management options that provide for the needs of multiple species are appropriate. This would include a diversity in size and decay class of down wood. If protection of rare species is a management goal, it is desirable to have knowledge about the requirements for those particular species and how that habitat can be achieved and maintained. Although we know little about down wood requirements for most individual species, knowledge of ecological function may guide decision making in this area. For example, requirements for mycorrhizal fungi include not only down wood, but presence of living host plants of the appropriate species and age. For wood-decay fungi, the size and decay class of the down wood may be the primary factors. If enhancement of mushroom production then the ecological factors controlling fruiting can also become important in guiding the management decision.

Directly from the horses mouth....
https://apps.fs.usda.gov/r6_decaid/views/fungi.html#:~:text=%20Importance%
20of%20Fungi%20in%20Forest%20Ecosystems%20,recycle%20carbon%2C%
20minerals%2C%20and%20nutrients%20for...%20More%20

Sun Aug 05, 2022 08:52 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Why it's time to include fungi in global conservation goals
https://phys.org/news/2022-05-flora-fauna-fungi-global-goals.html

Healthy ecosystems need fungi

The amazing biological fungal kingdom includes everything from bracket fungi, molds and yeasts to mushrooms and more. Fungi are not plants, although they're usually stocked near fresh produce in grocery stores. In fact, they're more closely related to animals.

Fungi play essential ecological roles worldwide. Some have been forming critical partnerships with plant roots for hundreds of millions of years. Others break down dead plants and animals and return key nutrients to the soil so other life forms can use them.

Fungi are among the few organisms that can degrade lignin, a main component of wood that gives plants their rigidity. Without fungi, our forests would be littered with huge piles of woody debris.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species currently includes 551 fungi, compared to 58,343 plants and 12,100 insects. About 60% of these listed fungal species are gilled mushrooms or lichenized fungi, which represent a very narrow sampling of the fungal kingdom.

Protecting our fungal future

Even with limited knowledge about the status of fungi, there is increasing evidence that climate change threatens them as much as it threatens plants, animals and other microbes. Pollution, drought, fire and other disturbances all are contributing to losses of precious fungi.

This isn't just true on land. Recent studies of aquatic fungi, which play all kinds of important roles in rivers, lakes and oceans, have raised concerns that little is being done to conserve them.

It is hard to motivate people to care about something they do not know about or understand. And it's difficult to establish effective conservation programs for organisms that are mysterious even to scientists. But people who care about fungi are trying. In addition to the IUCN Fungal Conservation Committee, which coordinates global fungal conservation initiatives, various nongovernment organizations and nonprofits advocate for fungi.

Over the past two years, we have seen a surge of public interest in all things fungal, from home grow kits and cultivation courses to increased enrollment in local mycological societies. We hope this newfound acceptance can benefit fungi, their habitats and people who study and steward them. One measure of success would be for people to ask not just whether a mushroom is poisonous or edible, but also whether it needs protection.

Delegations from most of the world's countries will meet in China this fall for a major conference on protecting biodiversity. Their goal is to set international benchmarks for conserving life on Earth for years to come. Mycologists want the plan to include mushrooms, yeasts and molds.

Anyone who takes their curiosity outdoors can use community science platforms, such as iNaturalist, to report their observations of fungi and learn more. Joining a mycology club is a great way to learn how to find and harvest fungi responsibly, without overpicking or damaging their habitats.

Fungi are forming important networks and partnerships all around us in the environment, moving resources and information in all directions between soil, water and other living things. To us, they exemplify the power of connection and cooperation—valuable traits in this precarious phase of life on Earth.

Sun Aug 05, 2022 09:17 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Fungi are forming important networks and partnerships all around us in the environment, moving resources and information in all directions between soil, water and other living things. To us, they exemplify the power of connection and cooperation—valuable traits in this precarious phase of life on Earth.
https://phys.org/news/2022-05-flora-fauna-fungi-global-goals.html

Protecting Fungi protects forests, biodiversity, the economy, water resources, reduces the impact of climate change and much more,....

Cutting down forest trees is counter productive, creates heat, water evaporation, loss of biodiversity, is not sustainable and expensive both to the forest and humans.

On the other hand....

"Fungi are Forest Management" they are efficient, economically feasible(free), sustainable(free and continuous), and ecologically sound (feeds biodiversity) .
A win for the forests, trees, biodiversity and a Win for humankind.

sacjon Aug 05, 2022 10:28 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

SUN - fungi is amazing in that respect. Don't bother with these folks though, they truly feel and believe to their core that the Earth needs humans to help her. She has taken care of her own for millions of years without ever needing hairless monkeys to rake her forests. She doesn't need us mucking about with everything all the time!

chico berkeley Aug 05, 2022 09:43 AM
Logging and Chaparral Removal Proposed Across 235,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest

Way to go edhat.
You let a couple of people who are the cut and paste specialists with no real experience use OTHER forests to tell us how to manage ours.
You delete my totally legit reason for burning in the LOS PADRES NATIONAL FOREST, not some place in Oregon or Washington.
That shit doesn't work for our forest, which is what the article was about.
LAME.

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