Lessons Learned From Recent Storms

Lessons Learned From Recent Storms title=
Lessons Learned From Recent Storms
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Source: Santa Barbara County

Lessons learned from recent storms are helping Santa Barbara County prepare for upcoming rain events, including refining evacuation plans for the Extreme and High Risk areas. In addition, the online interactive Debris Flow Risk Map now shows changes to the risk areas from Extreme Risk to High Risk in the city of Carpinteria based on that city’s staff analysis.

For future storms, including those expected to arrive later this week, the County will now take into account several factors to determine if only the Extreme Risk area, noted as red in the Debris Flow Risk Map, should be evacuated, or if both the red Extreme and yellow High risk areas should be evacuated.

The decision whether to issue evacuation warnings and orders for both risk areas will be based on a number of factors: projected amount and intensity of rainfall; capacity of debris basins and creek channels at the time of a predicted storm; status of potential obstructions that can change the direction of water flow; the level of ground saturation; and, the risk of damage to basic utilities.

“Each storm since the 1/9 Debris Flow adds to our understanding and ability to make decisions to keep residents safe, evacuate residents only when necessary, and return residents home as soon as possible,” said Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown.

Prior to each storm, emergency and public safety officials meet to determine potential impact and evacuation-related factors. “As we know, meterological forecasts have a lot of uncertainty. Storms can easily exceed forecasts, and we constantly balance this possibility with actions need to keep the public safe,” concluded Rob Lewin, director of the Santa Barbara County Office of Emergency Management.

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Red Creek Mar 14, 2018 09:42 AM
Lessons Learned From Recent Storms

When buying property (real property) find a professional with under lying local knowledge, not just a tour guide.

Bob Wilson Mar 13, 2018 07:20 PM
Lessons Learned From Recent Storms

Sorry, but professional emergency managers, elected sheriffs, and high paid government officials should not be learning lessons after 23 people die. They should’ve known that a significant storm following the largest fire in the history of the state would’ve created historical debris flows. The real lesson learned is that we had inexperienced and ill-prepared people at the helm on 1/9/18.

Bob Wilson Mar 14, 2018 06:44 AM
Lessons Learned From Recent Storms

Alternatively, there’s always an apologist who will blindly come to the defense of incompetence

Bob Wilson Mar 14, 2018 06:44 AM
Lessons Learned From Recent Storms

Alternatively, there’s always an apologist who will blindly come to the defense of incompetence

Bob Wilson Mar 14, 2018 06:44 AM
Lessons Learned From Recent Storms

Alternatively, there’s always an apologist who will blindly come to the defense of incompetence

Bob Wilson Mar 14, 2018 07:00 AM
Lessons Learned From Recent Storms

Alternatively, there’s always an apologist who will blindly come to the defense of incompetence

Bird Mar 13, 2018 10:26 PM
Lessons Learned From Recent Storms

Flicka, I was there then and there are similarities in the Glen Oaks area and elsewhere but this one was MUCH, MUCH, MUCH more severe. Then, the bridges were not washed out, for instance. Then, too, there were not the deaths. Another major distinction is that there were no so many houses on Randall Road (and I don't even recall Randall Road) and the houses at the foot of Olive Mill are/were also new. There at the corner of Hot Springs and East Valley where the families lost their lives and the houses vanished, was a location waiting to be demolished, as it was by this debris flow. I remember going there after 1969 flow and marveling that there was not damage. There will be difficult rebuilding... decisions to be made; the entire Montecito is an alluvial fan, built from earth washing down from the steep canyons of the mountains.

Flicka Mar 13, 2018 03:58 PM
Lessons Learned From Recent Storms

I just saw a photo of the 1964 flood and a home in Glen Oaks in Montecito was destroyed to the point it looked like a picture from this recent debris flow. In 64 the creek just west of Toro Canyon (crosses E. Valley) had more boulders come down than in this recent event.

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