Spotted Sandpiper: SB Wildlife Care Network's Patient of the Week

Spotted Sandpiper: SB Wildlife Care Network's Patient of the Week title=
Spotted Sandpiper: SB Wildlife Care Network's Patient of the Week
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Source: SBWCN

Patient #365 of 2021: Spotted Sandpiper

Status: Still in Care

Patient #365 at Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network is a spotted sandpiper! These sandpipers are small shorebirds that are distinguishable by their unique tail-bobbing motion when they walk. During breeding season, their white breast plumage will develop bold, dark spots. Spotted sandpipers also have noteworthy parental roles: after the female lays her eggs, the male will take charge of incubating the eggs and caring for the chicks. This species is the most widespread breeding sandpiper in North America.

Patient #365 happened to be discovered lying on the beach by one of Network’s team members during a walk at More Mesa. Upon arriving at the Center, this patient was found to have injuries consistent with a dog attack. Luckily for this bird, the severity of the injuries extended to some bruising, soft tissue swelling, and missing feathers in the wing. The Center’s expert animal care team will continue treating the sandpiper with medication and supportive care as it heals from the bruising and is ready to be released.

In 2020 alone, the Center received over 100 patients that were victims of dog attacks. Those attacks involve a number of species, including mammals, songbirds, and shorebirds like this sandpiper. Remember: keeping your dog on a leash (especially at the beach) can help protect local wildlife. 

If you’d like to support Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network’s efforts, visit www.sbwcn.org/donate.

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Minibeast Mar 07, 2021 09:24 PM
Spotted Sandpiper: SB Wildlife Care Network's Patient of the Week

SBWCN: As a longtime supporter and donor, I am shocked and dismayed at your post here and its **attack** on dogs. I would very much like to know who is responsible for writing this blatant fabrication. ----------------------- As a dog owner and dog walker here in Santa Barbara for many many decades, I have yet to see a single shorebird fall prey to a dog attack ----------- not unless that bird is already ailing, sitting onshore and waiting to die. As someone who has often taken dog owners to task for allowing their dogs to chase shorebirds, I agree that dogs should be trained to leave shorebirds be and allow those birds to feed in peace. Your posting here, however, vilifies dogs and makes it sound as though dogs are rampaging up and down the beaches killing shorebirds. Dogs are also killing songbirds? Whoever wrote this tripe----shame on you. And shame on Edhat for posting such anti-dog propaganda.

Pebblehill Mar 08, 2021 12:26 AM
Spotted Sandpiper: SB Wildlife Care Network's Patient of the Week

Minibeast- what you are missing is some perspective...as a volunteer at SBWCN I can tell you that of the 4k animals brought in last year, at least a hundred were from dog attack. So about 2.5% and NOT an exaggeration. Lots of babies that do not move fast, some window strike birds that would have flown away after being stunned, the list goes on. No one is vilifying dogs here. Just stating facts.

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