Articles From : rlevinsonemley

  • HUMANITIES DECANTED: LAL ZIMMAN, TRANSGENDER LANGUAGE REFORM: SOME CHALLENGES AND STRATEGIES FOR PROMOTING TRANS-AFFIRMING, GENDER-INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE
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    HUMANITIES DECANTED: LAL ZIMMAN, TRANSGENDER LANGUAGE REFORM: SOME CHALLENGES AND STRATEGIES FOR PROMOTING TRANS-AFFIRMING, GENDER-INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE

    Join us for a presentation and discussion with Lal Zimman (Linguistics) about his new work, “Transgender Language Reform.” Refreshments will be served.

  • FIRST WRITERS AND SCHOLARS IN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES CONFERENCE: VERBAL KALEIDOSCOPE
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    FIRST WRITERS AND SCHOLARS IN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES CONFERENCE: VERBAL KALEIDOSCOPE

    In a time where indigenous literatures are becoming more distinguishable, it is crucial to explore, challenge, and reformulate preexisting notions of spaces, identity, and knowledge. For the first time at UCSB, renowned indigenous poets of Mexico and the Basque country will establish an international dialogue with top scholars from all over the world to discuss the topic of the poetic act as a factor of visibility for marginalized cultures and political action.

  • FIRST WRITERS AND SCHOLARS IN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES CONFERENCE: VERBAL KALEIDOSCOPE
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    335

    FIRST WRITERS AND SCHOLARS IN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES CONFERENCE: VERBAL KALEIDOSCOPE

    In a time where indigenous literatures are becoming more distinguishable, it is crucial to explore, challenge, and reformulate preexisting notions of spaces, identity, and knowledge. For the first time at UCSB, renowned indigenous poets of Mexico and the Basque country will establish an international dialogue with top scholars from all over the world to discuss the topic of the poetic act as a factor of visibility for marginalized cultures and political action.

  • CROSSINGS + BOUNDARIES TALKS: SINAN ANTOON AND SARA PURSLEY
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    426

    CROSSINGS + BOUNDARIES TALKS: SINAN ANTOON AND SARA PURSLEY

    Talk: The Times of Revolution in Jawad Salim’s Monument to Freedom

  • CROSSINGS + BOUNDARIES TALK: BORDERWALL AS ARCHITECTURE
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    CROSSINGS + BOUNDARIES TALK: BORDERWALL AS ARCHITECTURE

    Ronald Rael holds the Eva Li Memorial Chair in Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley. He is an applied architectural researcher, design activist, author, and thought leader in the fields of additive manufacturing and earthen architecture. He is the author of Borderwall as Architecture: A Manifesto for the U.S.-Mexico Boundary (2017), which advocates for a reconsideration of the existing barrier dividing the U.S. and Mexico through design proposals that are hyperboles of actual scenarios that have occurred as a consequence of the wall.

    Image courtesy UC Berkeley

  • IHC VISITING SCHOLAR TALK: MEDIA BEFORE GUTENBERG
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    IHC VISITING SCHOLAR TALK: MEDIA BEFORE GUTENBERG

    Although “media” conjures modern, technologized modes of communication (television, the internet, print journalism), mediation is a central part of all communication. In the Middle Ages, media referred to networks of voices, texts, bodies, human actions, and nonhuman forces that were involved in sense perception, social interaction, storytelling, and other acts of cultural transmission.

  • RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP TALK: LISO’S ANNUAL JOHN J. GUMPERZ LECTURE
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    RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP TALK: LISO’S ANNUAL JOHN J. GUMPERZ LECTURE

    John B. Haviland will present a lecture on “K’alal Lajyak’bekon Notisia, ‘Bweno Ta Xinupunkutik’, Gloria a Dios, Háganlo Bien (When they told me ‘Well, we’re getting married’—Glory to God! Do it well!): Changing Tzotzil Discourses of Marriage.”

  • TAUBMAN SYMPOSIA TALK: BIBLICAL WOMEN AND GENDER CONSTRUCTIONS: ANCIENT AND CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES ON WOMEN IN THE BIBLE
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    465

    TAUBMAN SYMPOSIA TALK: BIBLICAL WOMEN AND GENDER CONSTRUCTIONS: ANCIENT AND CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES ON WOMEN IN THE BIBLE

    Rabbi Prof. Dr. Tamara Cohn Eskenazi is the Effie Wise Ochs Professor of Biblical Literature and History at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Los Angeles. She is the first woman appointed as a professor to the rabbinical faculty since the founding of Hebrew Union College in 1875. At Hebrew Union College, Dr. Eskenazi trains rabbis, educators, and Jewish communal service professionals, as well as graduate students in Judaic Studies.

  • CROSSINGS + BOUNDARIES TALK: MURDER AND MATTERING IN HARAMBE’S HOUSE
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    CROSSINGS + BOUNDARIES TALK: MURDER AND MATTERING IN HARAMBE’S HOUSE

    Date change to Tuesday, March 6th at 4:00PM.

    This talk approaches the controversy over the killing of the gorilla Harambe in the Cincinnati Zoo in May 2016 as a unique window onto the making of animalness and blackness in the contemporary U.S. It will explore the notion of a racial-zoological order in which the “human” is constructed simultaneously in relation to both the “black” and the “animal.”

  • RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP: GRANT BUDGETS
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    405

    RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP: GRANT BUDGETS

    How to Write a Grant Budget: how to manage grant funds.

  • THE 2018 DIANA AND SIMON RAAB WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE: HELEN MACDONALD
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    THE 2018 DIANA AND SIMON RAAB WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE: HELEN MACDONALD

    This year’s Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence is acclaimed naturalist and writer Helen Macdonald. She is the author of three books, including Shaler’s Fish (2001), Falcon (2006), and H is for Hawk (2014), winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction, the Costa Book Award, and the Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger. Her work includes poetry, naturalist non-fiction about birds, and memoir. She is a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine.

  • THE 2018 DIANA AND SIMON RAAB WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE: HELEN MACDONALD
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    THE 2018 DIANA AND SIMON RAAB WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE: HELEN MACDONALD

    This year’s Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence is acclaimed naturalist and writer Helen Macdonald. She is the author of three books, including Shaler’s Fish (2001), Falcon (2006), and H is for Hawk (2014), winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction, the Costa Book Award, and the Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger. Her work includes poetry, naturalist non-fiction about birds, and memoir. She is a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine.

  • RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP: INTRO TO THE NEH
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    485

    RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP: INTRO TO THE NEH

    Learn about grant programs at the National Endowment for the Humanities.

  • TALK: BURGERS IN THE AGE OF BLACK CAPITALISM: FAST FOOD AND THE REMAKING OF CIVIL RIGHTS AFTER 1968
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    TALK: BURGERS IN THE AGE OF BLACK CAPITALISM: FAST FOOD AND THE REMAKING OF CIVIL RIGHTS AFTER 1968

    Marcia Chatelain (History, Georgetown) is the author of South Side Girls: Growing up in the Great Migration (2015) and co-editor, with Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson, of Staging a Dream: Untold Stories and Transatlantic Legacies of the March on Washington (2015).

    This event is part of “Food, Finance, and American Politics,” a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

  • CROSSINGS + BOUNDARIES TALK: MURDER AND MATTERING IN HARAMBE’S HOUSE
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    686

    CROSSINGS + BOUNDARIES TALK: MURDER AND MATTERING IN HARAMBE’S HOUSE

    This talk approaches the controversy over the killing of the gorilla Harambe in the Cincinnati Zoo in May 2016 as a unique window onto the making of animalness and blackness in the contemporary U.S. It will explore the notion of a racial-zoological order in which the “human” is constructed simultaneously in relation to both the “black” and the “animal.”

  • RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP SYMPOSIUM: CROSS-CURRENTS: NAVIGATING TRANSLATION
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    409

    RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP SYMPOSIUM: CROSS-CURRENTS: NAVIGATING TRANSLATION

    Please join the American Indian & Indigenous Collective (AIIC) and keynote speakers Dr. Cutcha Risling-Baldy and Dr. Donald Fixico for three days of panels, presentations and discussions exploring the cross-current of translation writ large for Native and Indigenous peoples.

  • RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP SYMPOSIUM: CROSS-CURRENTS: NAVIGATING TRANSLATION
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    427

    RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP SYMPOSIUM: CROSS-CURRENTS: NAVIGATING TRANSLATION

    Please join the American Indian & Indigenous Collective (AIIC) and keynote speakers Dr. Cutcha Risling-Baldy and Dr. Donald Fixico for three days of panels, presentations and discussions exploring the cross-current of translation writ large for Native and Indigenous peoples.

  • RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP TALK: FINDING ECHIGO IN EDO: SNOW COUNTRY MIGRANTS AND THEIR URBAN WORLDS
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    RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP TALK: FINDING ECHIGO IN EDO: SNOW COUNTRY MIGRANTS AND THEIR URBAN WORLDS

    The Echigo province migrant was a familiar type in nineteenth-century Edo. Every year in the tenth month, snow country peasants would come down the mountains on the Nakasendō Highway and enter the city through Itabashi Station. They wandered down the main street in Hongō, where they were met by labor scouts who had learned to recognize their bewildered expressions and country accents. Many ended up in the city’s notorious boarding houses for laborers, where they were dispatched to rice polishers and bathhouses. Others found work in service with the help of migrants who had come before.

  • RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP TALK: FINDING ECHIGO IN EDO: SNOW COUNTRY MIGRANTS AND THEIR URBAN WORLDS
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    314

    RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP TALK: FINDING ECHIGO IN EDO: SNOW COUNTRY MIGRANTS AND THEIR URBAN WORLDS

    The Echigo province migrant was a familiar type in nineteenth-century Edo. Every year in the tenth month, snow country peasants would come down the mountains on the Nakasendō Highway and enter the city through Itabashi Station. They wandered down the main street in Hongō, where they were met by labor scouts who had learned to recognize their bewildered expressions and country accents. Many ended up in the city’s notorious boarding houses for laborers, where they were dispatched to rice polishers and bathhouses. Others found work in service with the help of migrants who had come before.

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