Articles From : ihcucsb

  • READING: UC SANTA BARBARA STUDENT VETERAN WRITERS
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    READING: UC SANTA BARBARA STUDENT VETERAN WRITERS

    Nine student veterans will read stories about their military experiences.

  • CHIMERA: A PUBLIC READING FEAT. MAIZA HIXSON
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    CHIMERA: A PUBLIC READING FEAT. MAIZA HIXSON

    CHIMERA is a science fiction play set in 2050 that centers around a love triangle and an artificially intelligent firefighting cyborg named AICH#805. Entertaining the fate of human existence in an era of climate change, the play discusses technological innovations that move us closer to “the singularity”—the moment when super-intelligent machines evolve without human assistance—as we simultaneously grapple with the more immediate threat of environmental collapse. Our main characters must reconcile the past and save humanity before being expelled from planet Earth.

  • ARTIST TALK: AMERICAN COTTON
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    111

    ARTIST TALK: AMERICAN COTTON

  • RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP WORKSHOP: RACING RANK – Jeannine DeLombard
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    RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP WORKSHOP: RACING RANK – Jeannine DeLombard

    For many of us today, the artifice of legal personhood — the corporate person in particular — provokes outrage. Focusing on the legal fiction of slave personhood, this paper argues that in the 19th-century U.S. the greater danger came from naturalizing this artifice by attaching it to actual African American people, regardless of condition. This reconsideration of legal personhood contributes to current efforts by political theorists, legal historians, classicists, and philosophers to historicize the concept of dignity prior to the 20th-century human rights regime.

  • LAUNCHING NEW RESEARCH IN THE HUMANITIES: PRESENTATIONS BY THE IHC’S 2018-19 FACULTY FELLOWS – Elena Aronova, Karen Lunsford, Amit Shilo, Martha Sprigge
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    LAUNCHING NEW RESEARCH IN THE HUMANITIES: PRESENTATIONS BY THE IHC’S 2018-19 FACULTY FELLOWS – Elena Aronova, Karen Lunsford, Amit Shilo, Martha Sprigge

    Please join us in celebrating our 2018-19 Faculty Fellows, whose works-in-progress are supported this year by IHC release-time awards. Fellows will give a short presentation of their work. A reception will follow.

    Elena Aronova, History
    “Making Science History: The Forgotten Socialist Roots of Big History and Big Data”

    Karen Lunsford, Writing Program
    “The Effects of Intellectual Property Law in Writing Studies: Ethics, Gatekeepers, and Academic Knowledge-Making”

  • RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP TALK: THE DIRT ON RUBBISH: WHAT DISCARD TELLS US ABOUT HOME LIFE IN ROMAN EGYPT
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    RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP TALK: THE DIRT ON RUBBISH: WHAT DISCARD TELLS US ABOUT HOME LIFE IN ROMAN EGYPT

    This paper explores activities of cleaning and disposing because they represent key principles of social organization. Close attention to discard behavior helps us to understand how people related to the material goods and places that once made up their object worlds – their material habitus (c.f. Meskell, 2005: 3). Human relationships to defilement, in particular, must be seen in in the context of how human identity as a rational being is established and maintained (Kristeva, 1982; Lagerspetz 2018).

  • 2019 ARTHUR N. RUPE GREAT DEBATE: IMMIGRATION: A BOON OR BURDEN TO U.S. SOCIETY?
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    2019 ARTHUR N. RUPE GREAT DEBATE: IMMIGRATION: A BOON OR BURDEN TO U.S. SOCIETY?

    Experts on immigration, national security and refugee movements will engage in a debate about the U.S. immigration system, the values and interests it serves and the impact of immigration on the nation.

    Mark Krikorian, Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies, is the co-author of Open Immigration: Yea & Nay and the author of The New Case against Immigration, Both Legal and Illegal and How Obama is Transforming America through Immigration.

  • THE LAWRENCE BADASH MEMORIAL LECTURE SERIES: SCIENCE, FREEDOM, AND THE COLD WAR: A POLITICAL HISTORY OF APOLITICAL SCIENCE
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    145

    THE LAWRENCE BADASH MEMORIAL LECTURE SERIES: SCIENCE, FREEDOM, AND THE COLD WAR: A POLITICAL HISTORY OF APOLITICAL SCIENCE

    Why do so many U.S. scientists continue to lean on the language of apolitical science, even as political leaders display less and less interest in scientists’ claims to expertise, or even the existence of facts? In a new book, Freedom’s Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science, historian Audra J. Wolfe suggests the answer lies in Cold war propaganda.

  • HUMANITIES DECANTED: RUTH HELLIER-TINOCO, PERFORMING PALIMPSEST BODIES: POSTMEMORY THEATRE EXPERIMENTS IN MEXICO
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    HUMANITIES DECANTED: RUTH HELLIER-TINOCO, PERFORMING PALIMPSEST BODIES: POSTMEMORY THEATRE EXPERIMENTS IN MEXICO

    Join us for a dialogue between Ruth Hellier-Tinoco (Music) and Jessica Nakamura (Department of Theater and Dance) about Hellier-Tinoco’s new book, Performing Palimpsest Bodies: Postmemory Theatre Experiments in Mexico. Refreshments will be served.

  • HUMANITIES DECANTED: SILVIA BERMÚDEZ, ROCKING THE BOAT
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    HUMANITIES DECANTED: SILVIA BERMÚDEZ, ROCKING THE BOAT

    Join us for a dialogue between Silvia Bermúdez (Spanish and Portuguese) and Cristina Venegas (Film and Media Studies) about Bermúdez’s new book, Rocking the Boat: Migration and Race in Contemporary Spanish Music. Refreshments will be served.

    Rocking the Boat is a nuanced account of how popular urban music, produced between 1980 and 2013, shaped the discourse on immigration, transnational migrants, and racialization in the Spanish State borne after the Constitution of 1978.

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