Articles From : PollockTheater

  • Special Effects: Beetlejuice
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    Special Effects: Beetlejuice

    In Tim Burton’s Beetlejuice (1988), Barbara and Adam Maitland (Geena Davis and Alec Baldwin) find themselves trapped as spirits haunting their old home after their untimely death in a car accident. To make matters worse, the residence has now been sold to the unbearable Deetze family (Catherine O’Hara, Jeffrey Jones, and Winona Ryder). When the Maitlands have little success in scaring the new residents away, they turn to rogue “bio-exorcist” Beetlejuice (Michael Keaton), an unpredictable spirit whose “help” quickly turns dangerous.

  • Special Effects: They Shall Not Grow Old
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    Special Effects: They Shall Not Grow Old

    Drawing on period footage from England’s Imperial War Museum and BBC radio interviews with World War I soldiers, director Peter Jackson’s They Shall Not Grow Old (2018) deploys state-of-the-art digital restoration technology to reanimate some of the world’s earliest war footage. Released in commemoration of the war’s centennial and dedicated to Jackson’s own grandfather who fought in the war, the film is an astonishing portal to the past that offers viewers a surprisingly intimate view of the everyday lives of British infantrymen.

  • Meet John Doe
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    Meet John Doe

    When D. B. Norton (Edward Arnold), an oil magnate with political ambitions, takes over a city newspaper and begins firing employees by the dozen, columnist Ann Mitchell (Barbara Stanwyck) fights back, penning a fake letter from a jobless “John Doe,” who in protest against the state of the world threatens to commit suicide by jumping off the City Hall roof. After the letter becomes the talk of the town, Mitchell and her editor hire a washed-up baseball player (Gary Cooper) to act and speak as the authentic John Doe.

  • Knock Down the House
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    Knock Down the House

    At a moment of historic volatility in American politics, insurgent candidates Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Amy Vilela, Cori Bush, and Paula Jean Swearengin decided to fight back and embarked on a journey that would change their lives and their country forever. Knock Down the House (2019) follows the grassroots campaigns of these four ambitious women as they challenge powerful incumbents in the 2018 congressional race.

  • New Waves: This is Not a Film
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    New Waves: This is Not a Film

    In 2010, after Jafar Panahi was arrested and charged with producing propaganda against the Iranian government, he was banned from making films or operating a camera for twenty years. In 2011 he made This is Not a Film, which was shot entirely in Panahi’s home, using the help of his friends, a camcorder, an iPhone, and the legal loopholes in his ban. The film debuted at Cannes after being smuggled into the festival inside a cake.

  • Special Effects: The Wizard of Oz
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    Special Effects: The Wizard of Oz

    When a tornado rips through Kansas, Dorothy (Judy Garland), her house, and her dog Toto are whisked to the magical land of Oz. At the advice of a chorus of locals, they follow the Yellow Brick Road toward the Emerald City in search of the infamous Wizard. En route they are joined by a Scarecrow (Ray Bolger) that needs a brain, a Tin Man (Jack Haley) missing a heart, and a Cowardly Lion (Bert Lahr) lacking in courage. Standing in the way of the group’s quest is the Wicked Witch of the West (Margaret Hamilton), who desperately seeks the return of her late sister’s shoes.

  • Special Effects: Mad Max: Fury Road
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    Special Effects: Mad Max: Fury Road

    The Carsey-Wolf Center is delighted to kick off its Special Effects series with George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road (2015). Winner of major awards for art direction, visual effects, costumes, stunts, and makeup, Fury Road pulses with stunning design elements and unforgettable action set pieces.

  • Blue Horizons 2019 Film Premiere
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    Blue Horizons 2019 Film Premiere

    Join us for the premiere of several engaging and topical short films produced by students in the UCSB Blue Horizons Summer Program for Environmental Media. During this nine-week summer program, students learn elements that are essential to producing documentary films – from developing a film’s core idea and story, to thinking about its impact on its audiences, to the nuts-and-bolts of video production. After examining the critical issues of our region’s oceans and seashores, students develop their own stories and produce their own short documentaries.

  • Script to Screen: Star Trek
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    Script to Screen: Star Trek

  • Crystal Voyager
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    Crystal Voyager

    David Elfick’s cult classic Crystal Voyager (1973) is a love letter to surf in the Santa Barbara Channel and a portrait of George Greenough, one of the sport’s great innovators. Written and narrated by Greenough and filmed at the height of surfing’s transition era, when riders and shapers were experimenting with new kinds of board design, the film chronicles the construction of a sailboat capable of reaching the uncrowded breaks of the Channel Islands.

  • Shoah: Four Sisters: The Hippocratic Oath and Baluty
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    Shoah: Four Sisters: The Hippocratic Oath and Baluty

    This special two-part event features Claude Lanzmann’s final film Shoah: Four Sisters.  Starting in 1999, Claude Lanzmann made several films that could be considered satellites of his 1985 masterpiece Shoah, comprised of interviews conducted in the 1970s that didn’t make it into the final, monumental work.

  • Shoah: Four Sisters: The Merry Flea and Noah’s Ark
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    Shoah: Four Sisters: The Merry Flea and Noah’s Ark

    The Pollock Theater’s two-part special screening of Claude Lanzmann’s final film Shoah: Four Sisters concludes with the film’s final two installments: The Merry Fleaand Noah’s Ark. Starting in 1999, Claude Lanzmann made several films that could be considered satellites of his 1985 masterpiece Shoah, comprised of interviews conducted in the 1970s that didn’t make it into the final, monumental work.

  • Gulabi Gang
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    Gulabi Gang

    Gulabi Gang (2012) is set in the badlands of Bundelkhand in central India, a place of dust, oppression, and resistance. This film follows the Gulabi Gang, an unusual group of rural women led by the energetic and charismatic Sampat Pal. They travel long distances to fight for the rights of women and Dalits. Often they encounter apathy, corruption, and even ridicule. Sometimes whole villages connive against them to protect the perpetrators of violence.

  • Ghana's Electric Dreams
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    Ghana's Electric Dreams

    Ghana’s Electric Dreams presents the planning and wide-ranging impact of the Akosombo Dam, Ghana’s most ambitious development project. The film visits sites affected by the hydroelectric dam and by the broader vision of modernization that it represents. Historical footage and interviews with Ghanaians reveal the complexity and contradictions, unintended consequences, social inequities, rural/urban divides, and gender differences that underlie this confluence of energy, power, and creativity in the West African country.

  • Short Films from the Viet Film Fest
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    Short Films from the Viet Film Fest

    Presented in conjunction with UCSB Reads 2019, this program of six shorts by filmmakers from the Vietnamese diaspora includes documentary, narrative, and experimental films. Like this year’s UCSB Reads text The Best We Could Do, these short films take up questions of Vietnamese heritage, family, and memory. This selection of films was curated in cooperation with the Viet Film Fest. Filmmakers Kady Le, Lan Nguyen, and Quyên Nguyen-Le will join moderator erin Khuê Ninh (Asian American Studies, UCSB) for a post-screening discussion.

    Films to be screened:

  • Script to Screen: Game of Thrones
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    Script to Screen: Game of Thrones

  • Shakedown
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    Shakedown

  • New Waves: This is Not a Film
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    New Waves: This is Not a Film

    In 2010, after Jafar Panahi was arrested and charged with making propaganda against the Iranian government, he was banned from making films or operating a camera for twenty years. In 2011 he made This is Not a Film, which was shot entirely in Panahi’s home, using the help of his friends, a camcorder, an iPhone, and the legal loopholes in his ban. The film debuted at Cannes after being smuggled there in a cake. With a playful charm, This is Not a Film grows from a diary of Panahi’s house arrest into an indirect examination of censorship, filmmaking, and plucky resourcefulness.

  • New Waves: Memories of Underdevelopment
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    New Waves: Memories of Underdevelopment

    Based on Edmundo Desnoes’ novel and presented here in a new 4k restoration, Tomás Gutiérrez Alea’s Memories of Underdevelopment (1968) is a fictional meditation on disillusionment in post-revolutionary Cuba. Left behind by his wife and family, the protagonist Sergio elects to remain in Havana following the failed Bay of Pigs invasion, an historical moment that the film chooses to reflect on through Sergio’s unmoored, flâneur-like lifestyle and anomie. The Cuban capital engulfs Sergio and simmers beneath the social and political forces of the Cold War. Ramon F.

  • New Waves: Red Sorghum
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    New Waves: Red Sorghum

    Directed by celebrated Chinese auteur Zhang Yimou (Raise the Red Lantern, Hero) and based on Nobel Prize-winning author Mo Yan’s novel, Red Sorghum is a landmark in contemporary Chinese cinema and culture. The film blends the stories of three generations of a family with their region’s journey through feudalism, war, and revolution. After several years as a cinematographer, Zhang Yimou chose Mo Yan’s novel for his directorial debut.

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