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What Is This Washing Ashore?
updated: Aug 13, 2014, 9:41 AM

By Edhat Subscriber

Ok, so now it's my turn to ask about what's washing up ashore... Some people have been posting about the velella washing up, but I've been finding so many of these at Hendry's lately. What are these??

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Comments in order of when they were received | (reverse order)

 COMMENT 544093 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 09:54 AM

Squid eggs.

 

 COMMENT 544094P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 09:54 AM

A lobster tail. I think they are molting this time of year. Just got back from Butterfly Beach and saw 6-8 lobster tails and heads on the sand by the water. Had they been freshly prepared on a silver platter with drawn butter I would have enjoyed an amazing breakfast!

 

 COMMENT 544097P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 09:57 AM

094 here. Going to buy reading glasses today. Looks like some sort of egg. Oops!

 

 COMMENT 544115 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 10:27 AM

It is a sea cucumber

 

 COMMENT 544123 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 10:45 AM

It is a special anniversary release of gummy bears. They are very popular with the kids these days. I'm sure that they drop some on the beach. They come in three colors and the black ones are most common.

 

 COMMENT 544128P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 10:55 AM

Pink sea cucumber.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_cucumber

That link has amazing info on these creatures. Absolutely fascinating.

 

 COMMENT 544144 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 11:21 AM

I am afraid everyone is incorrect so far. It is a pyrosome, which is a colonial tunicate colony. If you cut it you will see that it is hollow inside, and you will see the small red tunicate individuals imbedded in the matrix. When I first found one some years ago, I verified this with additional biology faculty here at UCSB (of which I am one). I have found some that are nearly a foot long at Devereux Beach!

 

 COMMENT 544151 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 11:37 AM

Salps.... in this case a tunicate colony of fire salps.

 

 COMMENT 544208 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 02:16 PM

It is one of those things you put on our finger to help sort paper. A large crate of them fell off a cargo ship.

 

 COMMENT 544210 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 02:21 PM

lol 150... up yours...

 

 COMMENT 544229 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 03:15 PM

Awe why did 150 get removed I can't lie, I thought of the same thing when I saw it.

 

 COMMENT 544252 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-13 04:48 PM

@123 -- Thanks for the giggle!

So glad someone asked this on Edhat. I saw one of those several months ago, took a pic, asked around, and never found out what it was. Thanks, Edhat people!

 

 COMMENT 544372 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-14 07:50 AM

rock candy

 

 COMMENT 544387P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-14 08:06 AM

Interesting that out of more than a dozen comments, only one (4144) appears to be based on actual knowledge and understanding. It is always baffling why people feel the need to say something when it would be so much better if they just kept their ignorance to themselves.

 

 COMMENT 544389 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-14 08:08 AM

I've seen these on the beach and I emailed the Sea Center for more because I found my kids squishing it. Here's what they wrote:

Hi there,

Those are salps, which are colonial planktonic tunicates. They do not have any stinging cells or anything so your daughter is safe to touch them.

Hope you continue to enjoy exploring our local beaches J
Sea Center Staff

 

 COMMENT 544442 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-14 10:11 AM

Well the sea center is close, but not quite right. Salps are also tunicates, but in the Family Salpidae. These are tunicates in the Pyrosomatidae.

 

 COMMENT 544480 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-14 11:28 AM

144 nailed it first, best thing though is they phosphoresce like crazy, hence their firey name.
yes, the mysterious glowing sea ....

 

 _1_ agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-14 03:00 PM

Looks the sea cucumbers my dad used to harvest and sell. They are dried and sold to be used in soup, etc. They are quite the delicacy in Japan. Not something I would go out of my way to eat!!!

 

 COMMENT 544609 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-08-14 03:51 PM

Not a cuke at all!!!
Salp

 

26% of comments on this page were made by Edhat Community Members.

 

*** 2 comments were deleted from this thread by the Edhat Board Nanny for violating Edhat Comments Board policy. Click Here to see them.

 

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