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Bug ID
updated: Apr 25, 2014, 3:41 PM

By Edhat Subscriber

Can someone ID this bug? Good or bad?

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Comments in order of when they were received | (reverse order)

 ROGER DODGER agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-25 03:46 PM

I think it's a good bug Don't spank it..

 

 COMMENT 514078P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-25 03:54 PM

Whatever the moral qualities of the bug, it's a very pretty picture!

 

 COMMENT 514080 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-25 04:05 PM

It looks like an assassin bug "Reduviidae" (there are many types) and are generally good in the garden as they eat other bugs, however they are not selective in their feeding habits; they eat the beneficial insects as well as pests.

 

 COMMENT 514083 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-25 04:09 PM

Looks like a type of tree cricket (Oecanthinae). They eat other bugs.

 

 COMMENT 514089P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-25 04:20 PM

Katydid.

 

 COMMENT 514091 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-25 04:27 PM

080 - Google sites agree. This is interesting, "Predatory Reduviidae use the long rostrum to inject a lethal saliva that liquefies the insides of the prey, which are then sucked out."

 

 COMMENT 514145P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-25 06:51 PM

I could have lived without the details, 091. Yuck.. ;-)

 

 COMMENT 514147 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-25 07:05 PM

The family "Reduviidae" also includes the "kissing bug" that can transmit to humans, a protozoa that is responsible for "Chagas" disease and whose symptoms vary, but can include some serious problems.

 

 COMMENT 514175 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-25 08:37 PM

Serendipity, we had one of these on one of our roses and I took a photo of it to the nursery by Gelson's and they couldn't ID it. Edhat comes through with the answer again.

 

 COMMENT 514188P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-25 09:37 PM

Be afraid, be very afraid.

 

 COMMENT 514209P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-26 01:19 AM

This bug of yours is NOT an assassin bug. Please note how your bug lacks the piercing rostrum/mouth part of an assassin bug. Google "images for assassin bug" and see.

Your bug is some type of cricket. Check out the back legs of your little guy. Those legs are long springs, made for jumping. Assassin bugs don't need to jump. Plus, an assassin bug has that noticeably long proboscis/rostrum/mouth part. That is how they stab their victims.

Crickets are good bugs. Plus, if you use Dolbear's method, crickets will tell you the outside temperature at night:
Pick out one cricket, count the number of chirps it makes in 15 seconds. Add 40 and you will know the temp.

Try it. It works. Then have fun noticing how much faster the crickets chirp, the warmer it is at night. I love my crickets.

 

 COMMENT 514229 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-26 07:27 AM

There is absolutely no question that it is a KATYDID NYMPH (juvenile). The oversized antennae and hind legs are the giveaway.

They eat flowers and other plant material as well as other bugs occasionally. I often see them eating roses.

As a zoology major and insect collector, I am certain of this ID. There is not even a slight chance they are assasin bugs!

 

 COMMENT 514232 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-26 07:44 AM

Zoology is not the branch of science that studies bugs! It's Entomology. The katydid nymph pics online show as 95% of them being green.

 

 COMMENT 514247P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-26 08:36 AM

A very reputable resource for these sorts of questions is the County Agricultural Commissioner's Office, in the local county Dep't of Weights and Measures office.

Email THEM this photo and you'll get the RIGHT answer every time. I.e.: they can respond to questions about their involvement in controlling plant diseases such as the Citrus Greening disease moving into our area.

While posting a photo on edhat is fun for the rest of us for varying reasons, it will also get you MIS-information.

agcommissioner@co.santa-barbara.ca.us

their SB office phone is 681-5600

 

 COMMENT 514259P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-26 09:00 AM

Join Bugguide.net to submit a photo to get it identified.

 

 COMMENT 514284 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-26 11:45 AM

Yes, a KATYDID NYMPH

 

 COMMENT 514295 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-26 01:07 PM

Assassin bug, confirmed.

 

 COMMENT 514323 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-26 03:07 PM

232- Zoology is the study of animals (animal kingdom) of which the study of insects/insect-type animals (entomology) is a subcategory . Therefore zoology is the branch of science that studies bugs (which are animals). However that does not mean all zoologists study bugs.

 

 COMMENT 514336 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-26 03:45 PM

Use crickets as a security measure, they always get quiet when someone is coming!

 

 VORAN agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-26 10:27 PM

Young katydids. And yes, they love to munch on your plants, especially aster-family flower petals. It annoys me when they do this, but I enjoy the critters, so I let them be!

 

 COMMENT 514427 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-27 08:51 AM

232 - tell that to the professors who teaches "invertebrate zoology" at UCSB. Insects are animals, and as 323 points out, entomology is a subspecialty of zoology.

There are many species of katydids; the local one pictured here happens not to have a green nymph . . . not all of them do.

 

 COMMENT 515157 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-04-30 08:54 AM

Aside from having 6 legs, this looks nothing at all like Reduviidae.

 

41% of comments on this page were made by Edhat Community Members.

 

 

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