Edhat
npr edvertisers
visitors movie times

Santa Barbara Weather: 89.4°F | Humidity: 43% | Pressure: 29.68in ( Falling) | Conditions: Clear | Wind Direction: North | Wind Speed: 5.4mph [see map]

Free Newsletter
Advertise
  login Edhat, where you create the news! Send your news item to ed@edhat.com
 
 
login
    15629 Subscribers
      696 Paid (4.5%)
     211 Comments
     119 Commenters
     74840 Page Views
 
 

 
The Winehound
The Winehound
 
Heart Walk
Heart Walk
 
Lemon Festival
Lemon Festival
 
Bike MS
Bike MS
 
Advertise on Edhat
Advertise on Edhat
 
News Events Referrals Deals Classifieds Comments About

more articles like this

East Camino Cielo Fencing Regulations
updated: Mar 10, 2014, 4:13 PM

By Edhat Subscriber

We live off of East Camino Cielo. Does anyone know how close you can put your fence to the Road up here?

Comments in order of when they were received | (reverse order)

 COMMENT 501660P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-10 04:33 PM

Just call the County Public Works Transportation Dept and ask them!

 

 COMMENT 501663 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-10 04:38 PM

County building codes determine setbacks.

 

 COMMENT 501664 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-10 04:39 PM

Ours is ~3ft from actual asphalt. I can't speak to legality but we haven't had anybody knocking on our door for 25 years.

 

 COMMENT 501666P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-10 04:51 PM

I know you are getting conflicting information, but I'd ask the counter at the Planning Department.

 

 RUDOLF THE RED agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-10 08:46 PM

Redwood is real nice. Typically roads need to be 20' wide and 14' high, to accommodate emergency vehicals. If the road meets these dimensions I would not worry to much, if it doesn't then you may want to find out where exactly the easement for the road is. I would go six feet high. If privacy is what you seek.

 

 COMMENT 501709 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-10 08:57 PM

Fences over 6' require a permit, otherwise, they are exempt from set-back requirements. Regardless, if they obstruct vehicles from seeing around corners, that is still a problem.

County Building department can clarify this with a visit.

 

 NATURE BOY agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-10 10:00 PM

RUDOLF: How can a road be 14 feet high? Not sure what you mean.

 

 COMMENT 501735 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-11 08:04 AM

733 just change the Americans to Santa Barbarian's and I think you got it

 

 COMMENT 501761 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-11 09:00 AM

The key to be aware of is NOT the distance from the edge of the pavement but the County (or City) right of way for the road. The right of way is universally wider than the paved portion of the road. Typically road right of ways are 60 feet wide but obviously more for a wider paved road. So, for example, a 32 foot wide 2 lane road may have two 16 foot wide paved traffic lanes for a total 32 foot width and the right of way may then extend 14 feet on each side of the paved roadway providing a "shoulder". A fence cannot be legally constructed in the road right of way without the permission of the municipality holding the right of way. Remember that the shoulder area of the road, is designed to allow vehicles to pull over and be completely off the paved portion of the roadway to stop there (and park if permitted). Average car width is about 7 feet.

 

 ZENYATTA19 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-11 09:09 AM

http://www.sbcountyplanning.org/permitting/index.cfm

 

 FLICKA agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-11 09:18 AM

Sure the poster can, and should, check with the County about regulations. However, the point of asking here is to get others' perspective of their knowledge and experience. Certainly not to have the critics come out in force.

 

 COMMENT 501772 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-11 09:20 AM

The zoning ordinance NOT building code determines setback. Check your land use zoning, then apply the setback requirements for your zone.

Ten feet back and six feet high are common. If you need privacy on ECC, you should move to the country.

 

 COMMENT 501779 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-11 09:42 AM

Please recognize the downside of building fences in relatively wild country such as East and West Camino Cielo. Many new fences are being constructed, and lots of these are of such tight mesh that they are impermeable to wildlife passage. I live up here and rejoice that occasionally I can still see a bear or deer. The good old 3-wire barb-wire fence was not an impediment; many new ones have the effect of greatly restricting animal movement.

 

 COMMENT 501782 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-03-11 09:50 AM

In the County (not City) jurisdiction you can put a fence six feet tall or less on your property line without zoning permits except at a street intersection the height is limited to three feet.

However, depending on the type of construction, a building permit may be required, e.g., for masonary walls.

 

43% of comments on this page were made by Edhat Community Members.

 

*** One comment was removed from this thread by the Edhat Board Nanny for violating Edhat Comments Board policy. Click Here to see it.

 

Add Your Comments

Edhat Username

password (email)

Comment

Don't have an Account?

Don't know if you have an account?

Don't remember your account info?

CLICK HERE


ENJOY HAPPY HOUR! ... Between 4:00pm & 5:00pm only happy comment are allowed on the Edhat Comments Board.

If you can't say something nice, don't say nothing at all.

 
Hide Your Handle, but show paid status (paid subscribers only)
NEW - use verified name and picture (contact ed@edhat.com to be verified)
Find out About Becoming A Paid Subscriber
NOTE: We are testing a new Comment Preview Page. You must hit OK on the next page to have your comment go live. Send Feedback to ed@edhat.com.
 

get a handle   |  lost handle

 

EDHAT COMMENTS POLICY

 

  See more articles like this

# # # #

 

Send To a Friend
Your Email
Friend's Email

Top of Page | Old News Archives | Printer-Friendly Page

  Home Subscribe FAQ Jobs Contact copyright © 2003-2014  
Edhat, Inc.