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Raising Edible Fish
updated: Jan 13, 2014, 2:10 PM

By Edhat Subscriber

Does anyone in Santa Barbara keep a pond to raise edible fish in? If so, I would like some tips to get started.

Comments in order of when they were received | (reverse order)

 COMMENT 484950 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 02:11 PM

You can do aquaculture with tilapia.

 

 COMMENT 484957 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 02:37 PM

950 really? I think there are a bunch of permits needed, those being an invasive species

 

 COMMENT 484960 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 02:47 PM

It is legal (only with a permit) to have Tilapia in only
6 counties of California (San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino, Los
Angeles, Imperial & Orange)... In any other county in California it's
illegal for any type of Tilapia.

 

 COMMENT 484961 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 02:51 PM

957, Try doing something without permission sometime...you might like it. OP, good luck with the pond and fish farming. Sounds like an awesome project.

 

 COMMENT 484968 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 03:18 PM

Perfect project choice for the impeding drought declaration.

 

 COMMENT 484976P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 03:32 PM

To translate 961's philosophy - "You don't care about living in a civilized society, do you?"

 

 COMMENT 484978 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 03:33 PM

Good idea. Maybe catfish and crawdads like at Casitas Lake! What with Fukishima spewing radioactive into the Pacific Ocean, self-raised fish may be the only local safe, healthy, and affordable fish to be had.

 

 COMMENT 484980 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 03:41 PM

I heard quagga mussels are the new hot freshwater farm item. Get 'em at your farmer's market today! Stir fry them, or eat them raw.

 

 COMMENT 484987 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 04:12 PM

I second 978's comment. If you have the space to raise your own fish, by all means do it. Whatever you do, don't eat anything pacific caught.

 

 COMMENT 484989 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 04:15 PM

I'm a raccoon and this sounds like a dinner invitation, seriously, aside from permits etc., you will need to research keeping the wild ones away. Birds of many species also fish in ponds (i.e. herons, hawks, etc.) as do the raccoons and possibly other wild animals.

 

 COMMENT 484990 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 04:15 PM

976, You seem to think that lack of specific permission means it's not OK and/or illegal. If that's civilization, please count me out. Fish farming sounds great.

 

 COMMENT 484992 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 04:25 PM

484987, why are you afraid to eat Pacific caught fish? What are you basing your fears on?

 

 COMMENT 485005 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 05:24 PM

Raising Tilapia in your own property is entirely legal for private consumption. They are not allowed commercially in SB County. Probably a good idea considering the ocean and food sources may get more and more contamination in the future

 

 COMMENT 485008P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 05:37 PM

Local Co Dept of Ag adivsor's office has plenty of info, or you can go online to the state website. Most tilapia are now gmo'd species. You might want to investigate other species. The Asian communities in the Central Valley do a lot of aquaponics for personal use, and reuse waste water in garden soil.

 

 COMMENT 485013P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 05:46 PM

Make sure you grow vegetarian fish (like tilapia). Growing carnivorous fish generally causes environmental problems. (No joke.)

 

 COMMENT 485021P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 06:34 PM

Wow, the sock puppets are out in force today.

 

 COMMENT 485025 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 07:07 PM

Maybe farm grown tilapia is good, but other wise my guy refuses to touch them after seeing what they like to eat. Of course that does solve some sewage issues in those countries

 

 COMMENT 485029 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 07:32 PM

I've got an aquarium and from time to time I like to snack on goldfish.

 

 COMMENT 485036 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 07:49 PM

You must be a big fish in a small pond.

 

 COMMENT 485041P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 07:57 PM

Go veggie. Raise fish to keep mosquitos out of your pond (free gambusia from County Vector Control). Otherwise, let fish swim free and happy. They're a lot of fun to watch. Cheap therapy.

 

 COMMENT 485055P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-13 11:19 PM

Gotta love the coy person who wonders why anyone might hesitate to eat Pacific fish nearly 3 years after Fukushima. (Sorry, bro, but if you make living catching or selling fish caught off the coast of California, that lifestyle has VERY limited shelf life - maybe you can get new career at SBBC;-)

 

 COMMENT 485066 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-14 07:07 AM

Sounds pretty gross....get some chickens, but isn't food still pretty cheap in the stores?

 

 COMMENT 485074P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-14 07:40 AM

You've got to wonder about people clueless enough to believe that Fukushima even remotely compares decades of nuclear explosions on and above the Pacific.

 

 COMMENT 485075 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-14 07:44 AM

Raising fish is a great idea. Just be sure to select a low water use species. Or get a fishing pole and head to the beach.

 

 COMMENT 485093 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-14 08:35 AM

In Hawaii we used to make fun of the people that ate Tilapia as they were the worst trash fish around. Now they are the new delicacy. I guess once you overfish the good-tasting ones, the ones remaining become delicacies.

 

 COMMENT 485115 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-14 09:08 AM

Having a fish pond whether farming fish, raising koi, or just having a pretty water feature, is REALLY expensive. I know my dad built two. A big one right before the drought in the mid 90's, which the new owners promptly filled in, and a small one on a friends property. The big one cost about $15k/yr for the trucks of water we had brought in. Cost per cf from the city would have been double. Twice, the recirc pumps failed, spilling nearly an acher foot of water to the field below. Good thing it was our field. The small one was only about 1000 gal, too small to raise fish to eat. The fish would have had to have a constant diet including anti-biotics. Not what I want to eat. What a waste of water AND money, but best of luck to ya, pal.

 

 COMMENT 485121 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-14 09:18 AM

093 - Lobster was once considered trash food for the poor... Funny how perceptions change. Personally, I dont like lobster but people seem willing to pay a lot to enjoy it...

 

 COMMENT 485151P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-14 10:12 AM

Clueless? Actually, it turns out that the US government began dumping massive amounts of radioactive waste into the Pacific ocean after WWII - which is probably why the government isn't interested in testing seafood for radiation now - the clueless have already been poisoning their selves for years, so why stop the party now?

Apparently, there's a major radioactive waste dump right off of San Francisco, so please pass the lobster... to those who enjoy a little radiation with their bottom feeders.

 

 COMMENT 485316P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-14 03:58 PM

151P - Yes, clueless. You changed the subject, but it doesn't change the fact that sea life is regularly tested for radioactivity, and the levels are measurable, but not significant. There was even an LA times article the other day by a marine researcher documenting how unfounded and irresponsible the Fukushima flap-and-squawks are.

 

 COMMENT 485428P agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-14 09:34 PM

If I'm clueless, then clue me in - exactly who, and how often are they testing seafood? And exactly what level of radioactivity do people with a "clue" consider safe? (Here's a clue for those who aren't desperate to prop up the seafood industry: REAL nuclear experts say there is NO safe level of radiation exposure, especially when it comes to ingesting 'hot particles' like strontium, uranium, plutonium etc.)

As for some article you read in the LA Times, I feel safer already knowing that that bastion of truth has declared concerns we "flap-and-squawks" have about Fukushima to be completely unfounded. YAY!

 

 COMMENT 485534 agree helpful negative off topic

2014-01-15 09:43 AM

Where do you think the Chemical weapons from Syria we are 'disposing' of are going? Into some ships for'treatment at sea'

 

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