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Santa Barbara Weather: 75.4°F | Humidity: 65% | Pressure: 29.91in ( Falling) | Conditions: Partly Cloudy | Wind Direction: South | Wind Speed: 9.2mph [see map]

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Late Night Heat
updated: Nov 14, 2013, 8:29 AM

By Edhat Subscriber

Am I going nuts or did it get about 10 degrees warmer since sunset on Wednesday night? Weather.com reporting 84 degrees at 9:00 PM.

Comments in order of when they were received | (reverse order)

 COMMENT 468722 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 08:35 AM

Yes it got warmer and perhaps dustier. I awoke at about 1:00 AM and checked, in order, whether furnace had been turned on for first time this season by other half, Edhat, and NOAA weather report for Noleta. SBA weather station reported 59 deg F at the time.

 

 COMMENT 468723 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 08:35 AM

Are you new in town? We had a sundowner and this is normal for this area.

 

 EZ2 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 08:35 AM

Ten pm ,last nite,seventy eight degrees on the west side
78 @ 10 pm

 

 COMMENT 468725 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 08:36 AM

What 723 said.

 

 COMMENT 468726P agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 08:37 AM

This is the season for sundowners or santanas. Happens every year around Thanksgiving. Welcome to Santa Barbara and know everyone needs to exercise super caution when dealing with fire and the back country. All of our recent horrific fires have been because of human carelessness during these red alert periods of hot dry winds.

They hot dry winds are psychologically disturbing as well so one starts seeing fires all over Southern California during this time of the year. Think of the Foehn winds in Europe, the Mistral and the Sirocco -- all legendary and disturbing to the normal pace of life.

 

 SHOREBIRD agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 08:40 AM

You are not going nuts.

 

 COMMENT 468728 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 08:48 AM

New in town? That was typical Sundowner conditions. A few years back during one of the events the heat peaked at something like 1:45am

 

 COMMENT 468733 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 09:01 AM

I got a great natural blow dry last night. My hair looks great.

 

 COMMENT 468734 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 09:09 AM

Welcome to SB!

 

 COMMENT 468736 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 09:15 AM

i ran around the back yard naked !!!

 

 COMMENT 468738 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 09:16 AM

You are not crazy, but the weather last night was. As a local, this happens occasionally, but usually during the summer or in late September/early October. By November the temperatures usually drop to the 60's, so this is unusual for this time of year despite what others attempted to purport.

 

 COMMENT 468739 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 09:22 AM

Santa Barbara does not get the sant ana winds those start at ventura co line and south, we get sundowners only. so when you see kcal or key news talking about sant ana winds, it does not affect sb at all

 

 COMMENT 468742 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 09:29 AM

736, how is that different from a normal night for you?

 

 COMMENT 468744 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 09:33 AM

Per the temperature graphs on Weather Underground, it did jump 10 degrees from 5 to 6 pm then stayed up until about 10pm. We fund a sun umbrella in our backyard. Hey! Free umbrella!

 

 COMMENT 468746 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 09:37 AM

In 1859 similar winds drove the temperature to 133 degrees in Santa Barbara.
That temp stood as the hottest temperature EVER in the United States until Death Valley did 134 degrees in 1913.

Just saying...those devil winds can be HOT!!!

 

 COMMENT 468750 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 10:00 AM

5 yrs to the day after the Tea Fire. Glad no fire bugs were out and about last night.

 

 COMMENT 468756 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 10:11 AM

It must be 5 o'clock somewhere. Time to guzzle a few cold ones.

 

 COMMENT 468768 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 10:34 AM

It was 82ºF downtown, and 84ºF on my car thermometer at State and 154 at or around10-30pm last night. It's not just the Sun that heats the air up around here on the coastal strip, also but katabatic "downslope" wind, the air warmed by compression... ad this often happens after sunset.

 

 COMMENT 468769 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 10:37 AM

lol @ "santana" winds .... New in town?

 

 COMMENT 468774P agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 10:42 AM

@769: I was thinking the same thing.

 

 COMMENT 468777 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 10:53 AM

It's going to be a record breaking hot day today.

 

 COMMENT 468793 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 11:17 AM

The high for yesterday, Wednesday, had been forecast to be in the 80s a few days earlier. Turned out to be true.

 

 COMMENT 468820P agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 11:50 AM

Wikipedia
"The most well-accepted explanation for the name Santa Ana winds is that it is derived from the Santa Ana Canyon in Orange County, one of the many locations the winds blow intensely.[1][4] Newspaper references to the name Santa Ana winds date as far back as 1886. By 1893, controversy had broken out over whether this name was a corruption of the Spanish term "Santana," or vice-versa. However, newspaper mention of the term "Santana" in reference to the winds did not begin appearing until more than 60 years later. A possible explanation is that Spanish speakers tend to merge two identical vowels in elision. Thus, the pronunciation of the phrase "Santa Ana" would be something like "Santana". A similar process occurs with the name of the city.

Los Angeles A to Z (by Leonard & Dale Pitt) credits the Santa Ana Canyon in Orange County as the origin of the name Santa Ana winds.[23]

Another attempt at explanation of the name claims that it derives from a Native American term for "devil wind" that was altered by the Spanish into the form "Satanas" (meaning Satan), and then later corrupted into "Santa Ana." However, an authority on Native American language claims this term "Santana" never existed in that tongue.[4]

A third explanation places the origin of the term Santa Ana winds with an Associated Press correspondent stationed in Santa Ana in 1902, who documented the name "Santa Ana winds," or possibly, mistook the term "Santana" for "Santa Ana."[24]

Dr. George Fischbeck was a widely viewed newscaster in Southern California in the 1970s and 1980s who helped to familiarize Californians with the winds, which he incorrectly referred to as the "Santana winds". He regularly explained that they were not confined to Orange County (where Santa Ana is located), but occurred throughout Southern California. He delighted in the symbolism of the devil's breath playing havoc with Southern California."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Ana_winds

 

 COMMENT 468822 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 11:54 AM

goleta once held the record for the highest recorded temperature on earth due to an extremely freak compressional heating event. 133 degrees fahrenheit on june 17th, 1859. only death valley has had a higher recorded temp (134 deg) in 1913. google "goleta-s-great-simoon-of-1859" for the UCSB article about this amazing weather event!

 

 COMMENT 468828 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 12:11 PM

The 133ºF reading is not recognized as a scientifically reliable temperature reading - it was not recorded by standard equipment, and the exposure of the thermometer would have almost certainly produced a higher temperature reading than was actually occurring. It was, however, an exceptionally hot day by any standard.

 

 ROB EGENOLF agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 12:23 PM

468828 that is not correct

The record temperature was recorded on equipment appropriate for the era on a Coastal Survey boat was offshore at the time.

 

 COMMENT 468847 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 12:50 PM

739 for the win!

 

 COMMENT 468849 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 12:56 PM

You are not going nuts. That fact alone may disqualify you from living here. :P

 

 COMMENT 468863 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 01:24 PM

oh come on everyone. just take your clothes off like 736... and enjoy it !!!

 

 COMMENT 468904 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 02:28 PM

Rob Egenolf - despite your "appropriate for the era" description of the equipment and presumably it's exposure to the atmosphere, it appears to be insufficient or non-standard as regards meteorological requirements. This 133ºF reading is not recognized by either the WMO or the NWS.

 

 COMMENT 468946 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 03:21 PM

Anything measured in the 1850's is suspect. The accuracy is certainly no better than +/- 5%. Coincidentally the strongest California earthquake was in that same decade....a 7.9 in 1857. Could have been Anything from a 7.2 to an 8.6.

 

 COMMENT 468972 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 03:51 PM

133 or not it was still hot has hell on that day in 1859:

"Rabbits, cattle, snakes (sic) and deer died on their feet according to a government report, and fruit fell from trees to the ground, scorched on the windward side. Birds fell dead from the sky and others flew into wells in search of cooler air and drowned."

"a fisherman in a rowboat made it to the Goleta Sandspit with his face and arms blistered as if he had been exposed to a blast furnace"

 

 COMMENT 469080 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-14 08:01 PM

Snakes getting run over by cars yeh, but died on their feet is kinda suspect to me. Of course according to Darwin and those little thingies I see on cars I guess back in the 1850's snakes might have grown feet and later evolved to finding it was more fun and stealthy to just slither around.

 

 COMMENT 469107P agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-15 03:20 AM

820P. Thanks for all the info.

Born and raised here and we always called them "Santa Anas." We all knew these winds weren't found only in Santa Ana, despite what some new-to-SB people might think/say.
Recently, I read how to tell a Sundowner from a Santa Ana: The Sundowner winds come from the East. The Santa Anas come from the NorthEast.
No one in SB ever called any of our hot dry winds "Sundowners" until about 15-20 years ago. Just as no one ever called the fog "The Marine Layer" until 15+ years ago.

 

 COMMENT 469118 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-15 07:06 AM

A mercury thermometer is pretty simple. It is about the same today as it was in 1850 and works the same as it did when invented in 1714. All the modern stuff with thermistors and transistors is calibrated with a mercury thermometer. Most likely cause for an unreliable extreme is a person known as a record setter. They always get an extra degree or two or maybe an extra inch of snow in the mountains. This is why much climate data is based on 99% of the reports, with the extremes being discarded.

 

 COMMENT 469166 agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-15 09:48 AM

The meteorlogical explanation for this phenomena is that rising air in the interior over hot desert or desert like areas is very warm air. When it falls toward the coastal regions particularly from very hgh altitudes it is heated even more by compression. This usually occurs late in the day and early evening when the heating producing the rising (high pressure air) has reached its highest altitude and temperature and the air is at maximum velocity at the bottom of foothill canyons. (hence the name "sundowners) I have been in the mountains at mid elevations when the sundowners clash with the on-shore coastal airflow (marine layer) and at the edges, the temperature will fluctuate between the two air masses in seconds with a difference of 20 to 40 degrees. A very strange local weather phenomena.

 

 JUKINJAY agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-15 03:41 PM

The two questions are not mutually exclusive. I have no opinion as to the first, but it did seem to get warmer last night, possibly a mild sundowner.

 

 CORKY agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-15 04:49 PM

78 ousidwhen I went to bed at 10:30.

 

 CORKY agree helpful negative off topic

2013-11-15 04:52 PM

The real name, no-one uses is Santanas, meaning devil winds. It got changed to Santa Anas, because they came from the direction of Santa Ana, but sundowners works for me.

 

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